Car Deal Canada

British Columbia Driver's Abstract

British Columbia

A driver’s abstract is an important record that provides details of an individual’s driving history. In British Columbia, the Insurance Corporation of BC (ICBC) is responsible for maintaining driver’s abstracts. An ICBC driver’s abstract includes information such as any collisions you’ve been involved in, convictions and penalties for driving violations, license suspensions or prohibitions, and a status of your driver’s license.

Having a copy of your own up-to-date driver’s abstract allows you to review your driving record. This ensures that the information on file with ICBC is accurate. Your driver’s abstract provides important details that are used to determine your insurance premiums. It can also influence your ability to finance cars or find employment that involves driving. First-time and new BC residents will begin building their driving history and record from their initial license application date.

In this comprehensive guide, we will cover everything you need to know about obtaining, reviewing, and understanding your BC driver’s abstract. Topics covered include:

 

  • What’s included in a BC driver’s abstract
  • How to get a copy of your own driving record
  • How far back your history is tracked
  • BC driver’s license types
  • Maintaining a clean abstract
  • Penalties for violations
  • Removing infractions from your record
  • Challenging incorrect information
  • Using your driving record responsibly

 

Having all this knowledge will ensure you understand the importance of your BC driver’s abstract and how to leverage it responsibly.

Get Pre-Qualified in Under 60 Seconds

All Credit Approved and 0 Money Down Options Available

 

Obtaining Your BC Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to request a copy of your BC drivers abstract depending on how quickly you need it and whether you want a paper or electronic copy. The fastest and easiest way is to request it online through ICBC’s driver licensing website. Here are the main options:

 

Request Online

To get your BC drivers abstract electronically online, simply go to ICBC’s website, click on the drivers services tab, and select “Your Driving Record”. From there you can enter your name, birth date, driver’s license number, and ICBC online access code. The cost is free and you will be emailed a PDF copy instantly.

 

In Person

You can also request a copy of your BC drivers abstract in person at any ICBC driver licensing office. Bring your valid BC driver’s license and a second piece of accepted ID. The standard fee is $15 for an electronic copy emailed to you or $25 for a printed copy.

 

By Mail

To have your BC drivers abstract mailed to you, you can print and complete ICBC’s Driver’s Licence Abstract Request Form. Mail it to the address listed along with a cheque or money order for $15 plus tax for an electronic copy or $25 plus tax for a printed version. Processing takes 7-10 business days.

 

Fees

The standard fee for obtaining your BC drivers abstract is $15 for an electronic copy or $25 for a printed copy requested online, in person, or by mail. Additional taxes apply for mailed requests. Faster services are available for insurance or employment purposes at higher costs.

 

What’s Included in a BC Drivers Abstract

A BC drivers abstract contains comprehensive information about your driving record and history. Some of the key details included are:

 

  • Driver’s license details – your full name, date of birth, license number, class of license, issue and expiry dates, and license status.
  • Driving violations and convictions – any tickets, warnings, suspensions, prohibitions, sanctions or penalties.
  • At-fault claims – collisions where you were deemed fully or partially at-fault by ICBC.
  • Convictions – Criminal Code convictions related to the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • Driver medical information – medical conditions that impact your ability to drive safely.
  • Driving history highlights – a 5 year summary of your key driving information.

 

Reviewing your abstract lets you verify that all information is complete and accurate. You can check for errors or omissions which could impact your insurance rates or ability to obtain a driver’s license.

 

How Far Back Does a BC Drivers Abstract Go

A standard BC drivers abstract contains information on traffic violations, license suspensions, and at-fault accidents for the last 5 years. This 5 year lookback period covers most personal drivers abstracts in BC.

However, there are some exceptions when a longer lookback period is required on a BC drivers abstract:

 

  • Commercial drivers abstracts in BC go back as far as 10 years. This provides a more complete record for drivers of large vehicles like semi trucks or buses.
  • If a drivers license was just obtained within less than 5 years, the full history since the license issuance will be provided on the abstract.
  • Serious Criminal Code driving convictions and prohibitions never expire from a BC drivers abstract, no matter how long ago they occurred.

 

So in summary, while 5 years is the standard coverage, commercial drivers and those with serious convictions may have additional history show up outside this period when ordering their drivers abstract in BC.

 

How Often Should I Check My Drivers Abstract

It’s a good idea to check your BC drivers abstract regularly to ensure everything is accurate and up to date. Here are some recommended times to access your driving record:

 

Annually

Get in the habit of checking your abstract once a year. This allows you to review all the information and make sure there are no errors or issues. You can catch any inaccurate violations early and have them corrected.

 

When Shopping for Car Insurance

Your driving record directly impacts your auto insurance rates. Checking your abstract before shopping for a new policy allows you to understand what’s on your driving history. You won’t get any surprises when the insurance company accesses your record.

 

Before a Road Test

If you are preparing to take a road or driving test to get your first license or upgrade your license class, ordering your abstract in advance is wise. Make sure there are no issues that could cause you to fail your test before you show up.

Reviewing your abstract regularly is the best way to stay on top of your driving record. This ensures you understand what violations or convictions are on file, so you can maintain a clean driving history.

 

BC Driver’s License Types

In British Columbia, there are several different classes of driver’s licenses you can obtain depending on the type of vehicle you need to operate.

The classes are:

 

  • Class 5: This is the standard license for passenger vehicles like cars and small trucks (under 11,794 kg). Most drivers have a class 5 license.
  • Class 4: For taxis, ambulances, limousines, and other passenger vehicles seating up to 25 people (including the driver).
  • Class 3: For large passenger vehicles which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Mostly used by bus drivers.
  • Class 2: For large buses which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Ideal for city bus drivers.
  • Class 1: Allows you to operate any motor vehicle including transport trucks and tractor trailers.

 

So in summary, most drivers need a Class 5 license for everyday driving of passenger cars and light trucks. Professional drivers of buses, taxis, and trucks require a higher class of license depending on the size of vehicle they need to operate.

It’s important to get the right class of license you need, otherwise you could be driving illegally if you operate a vehicle you don’t have the proper class for.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

One of the best ways to keep your drivers abstract clean is to avoid violations and at-fault collisions. Here are some tips for maintaining a violation and accident-free driving record in BC:

 

  • Obey all traffic laws and speed limits – Never exceed posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, and yield right-of-way when required.
  • Allow plenty of following distance – Leave at least 2 seconds between your vehicle and the one in front to allow time to react.
  • Limit distractions – Avoid using your phone, eating, or engaging in other activities that take your eyes and focus off the road.
  • Check blind spots – Always check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes or making turns.
  • Practice defensive driving – Be alert, anticipate other drivers’ actions, and be ready to react to hazards on the road.
  • Get enough rest before driving – Drowsy driving can impair your reaction time as much as alcohol.
  • Avoid aggressive driving – Don’t tailgate, gesture angrily, speed up when being passed, or engage in other confrontational behaviours.

 

Driving carefully and defensively is the best way to avoid collisions and traffic violations. This will help keep your BC drivers abstract clean and free of negative entries.

 

Violations that Show on a BC Drivers Abstract

When reviewing your BC drivers abstract, you may come across a variety of violations that will be listed. Some of the common violations that can appear include:

 

Speeding

Exceeding the posted speed limit is one of the most common violations that drivers receive. Any speeding tickets you get will show up on your abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. The number of demerit points you receive depends on how much over the speed limit you were going:

 

  • 1-20 km/h over = 2 points
  • 21-40 km/h over = 3 points
  • 41-60 km/h over = 4 points
  • More than 60 km/h over = excessive speed = 5-6 points

 

DUIs

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a major offense. Impaired driving convictions remain on your driving record for 10 years from the date of conviction. They carry heavy fines, license suspensions, vehicle impoundment, and jail time in addition to 5 penalty points.

 

Distracted Driving

Using a phone or electronic device while driving is against the law. If convicted, these tickets remain on your abstract for 3 years and come with 3 penalty points. Subsequent distracted driving convictions can lead to increased fines and points.

 

At-Fault Accidents

Being involved in an at-fault accident where you are deemed responsible can also lead to penalty points on your driving record. Minor at-fault accidents result in 2 points, while major at-fault accidents lead to 3 points. The number of points depends on the crash details and severity.

 

Driver Penalty Points System in BC

British Columbia utilizes a driver penalty point system to track driving violations and encourage safe driving practices. Points are assigned for various traffic violations and stay on a driver’s record for variable lengths of time depending on the offense.

When a driver is convicted of a driving infraction like speeding, failure to stop at a red light, or reckless driving, a set number of points will be added to their driver’s license record. More severe offenses result in higher points. For example, a speeding ticket may add 3 points while reckless driving could add 5 points.

These points accumulate and remain active for 2 years from the conviction date for most offenses. However, some serious violations like impaired driving can stay on record for up to 10 years. Driver’s with more points on their license are considered higher risk and may see increased insurance rates or have their license suspended if they surpass a certain threshold.

ICBC tracks these active points on every BC driver’s record. Drivers can check their current point total at any time by requesting a copy of their driver’s abstract. This allows you to monitor your driving record and understand the impact points may have on your driving privileges or insurance rates.

While a few points over time is usually not a major concern, maintaining a high total can have serious consequences. That’s why it’s important to always strive to drive safely and avoid violations in BC.

 

Consequences of Multiple Violations on Drivers Abstract

Having multiple violations on your drivers abstract can lead to serious repercussions in British Columbia. The two main consequences are increased insurance premiums and potential license suspension.

Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as higher risk and will charge significantly higher premiums. Each additional minor violation will typically increase your insurance rate by 20-30%, while major violations can increase it by 40% or more. The more violations you accumulate, the higher your insurance costs will rise.

The other major consequence is possible driver’s license suspension. If your drivers abstract shows multiple violations within a short timeframe, ICBC may decide to suspend your license for a period of time. Typically, if you accumulate 3 or more major violations or a combination of 6 minor and major violations within a 2 year period, your license can be suspended for up to 12 months.

The length of suspension will depend on the number and severity of violations. Suspensions generally range from 1-12 months for drivers with multiple violations. You may also be required to undergo remedial training or testing and pay a driver risk premium for up to 3 years after your license is reinstated.

The bottom line is that drivers in BC with numerous violations on their record face steep insurance premium hikes and potential license suspension. That’s why it’s critical to always drive safely, responsibly and violation-free.

 

Getting Violations Removed from BC Drivers Abstract

Having violations on your BC drivers abstract can increase your insurance premiums and make it difficult to find employment that requires driving. While some violations can’t be removed, there are a few ways you may be able to get certain convictions taken off your record:

 

Demonstrating Safe Driving

If you maintain a clean driving record for a set period of time, some violations will eventually drop off your abstract. Minor convictions like speeding tickets will be removed after 3 years of safe driving. More serious offenses can take up to 10 years to be deleted.

 

Driver Improvement Program

Completing an ICBC-approved driver improvement course may allow you to have a conviction removed earlier than the standard timeline. For example, if you take a responsible driver program, a speeding ticket can potentially be deleted after just 2 years instead of 3. Check with ICBC to see if you’re eligible for this option.

While it takes time and effort, having violations removed from your drivers abstract can help lower your insurance rates and open up job prospects. Focus on safe driving habits and take advantage of ICBC’s remediation programs whenever possible.

 

Challenging Information on Your BC Drivers Abstract

If you believe there is incorrect or incomplete information on your BC driver’s abstract, you have the right to dispute it. Here is the process to follow:

 

  1. Review your abstract closely and identify the specific information you wish to dispute. This may be an incorrect date, a traffic violation or accident that did not occur, etc.
  1. Contact ICBC’s Driver Information Services at 1-800-950-1498 to notify them of the incorrect information. Be prepared to provide your driver’s license number and explain what information is inaccurate.
  1. ICBC will open a dispute and investigate the records in question. You may need to provide supporting evidence such as court documents, police reports, receipts, etc. to back up your claim.
  1. If ICBC determines the records are incorrect, they will be amended or deleted from your driving abstract. This can take some time as changes need to be processed through the system.
  1. Request a new copy of your abstract to verify the changes have been made. You can view and print your updated abstract online.

 

If ICBC rejects your dispute claim, you have the right to escalate it further through legal channels. Things like timeframe restrictions and lack of concrete evidence can make successfully disputing items on your abstract challenging. But it is possible in cases of truly incorrect records.

 

Using Your BC Drivers Abstract

Your BC drivers abstract can be a very useful document beyond just checking your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways it can be used:

 

Getting a Job

Many employers will ask for a current copy of your BC drivers abstract, especially if driving is part of the job duties. Truck drivers, delivery drivers, rideshare drivers and more are often required to provide a clean, up-to-date abstract. Having a clean record can improve your chances of getting hired for driving jobs.

 

Lower Insurance

Insurance providers in BC use your driving record as a factor in determining your auto insurance premiums. The fewer tickets and accidents you have, the lower your risk, and generally the lower your insurance rates will be. Maintaining a clean abstract can pay off when your insurance is up for renewal.

 

Crossing the Border

A clean BC drivers abstract can help make crossing the US-Canada border smoother. Border agents may ask to see proof of a clean driving record. A recent abstract with no violations demonstrates you are a safe, lawful driver less likely to cause issues while in the US.

Having an up-to-date copy of your BC drivers abstract can be useful for employment, insurance and travel purposes. It’s a good idea to check it periodically to ensure it remains clean and accurate.

 

Drivers Abstracts in Other Provinces

 

While drivers abstracts in Canada generally provide similar information, there are some key differences across provinces that drivers should be aware of:

Alberta – Driver abstracts can be obtained online or by mail from Alberta Transportation. They contain your basic drivers license information, license status, violations, suspensions, and collisions. Driver abstracts go back 3 years.

Saskatchewan – The Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) provides drivers abstracts. You can request them online or by phone. They show convictions, suspensions and disqualifications over the past 3 years.

Manitoba – Manitoba Public Insurance provides digital driver abstracts instantly online showing your drivers history for the past 3 years. Drivers can also order paper abstracts by mail.

Ontario – You can request your drivers abstract online from ServiceOntario which contains convictions, suspensions and accidents over the past 3 years. An uncertified abstract is free but a certified copy costs a fee.

Quebec – Quebec drivers can obtain their abstract instantly online from the SAAQ. It will contain ticket information, demerit points, suspensions and accidents for the past 10 years.

New Brunswick – Driver abstracts can be requested from Service New Brunswick online, by mail or in person. They contain details on convictions and suspensions over the last 3 years.

Nova Scotia – Nova Scotia drivers can request an abstract online from Access Nova Scotia containing convictions and suspensions from the past 3 years.

While each province handles drivers abstracts a bit differently, they generally provide similar insights into a driver’s history. However, it’s important to know the specific laws in your province regarding how far back your record goes and what shows up on your abstract.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your driver’s abstract is a critical record of your driving history in British Columbia. Having a clean driving record with no violations or accidents is important for several reasons.

Firstly, it can help you qualify for lower auto insurance rates and avoid policy cancellations or non-renewals. Insurance providers view those with clean records as lower risk, translating to savings on premiums.

Additionally, maintaining a clean abstract is essential if you drive for work. Many employers will check your abstract before hiring for positions involving driving, and a poor record can disqualify you.

Lastly, if you are ever involved in an at-fault accident, evidence of past violations or charges for dangerous driving could affect the outcomes and liability. Your abstract provides proof of your driving behavior over time.

For all these reasons, it’s wise to regularly check your BC driver’s abstract and quickly address any inaccuracies. Following the rules of the road, driving defensively, and avoiding violations is the best way to keep your abstract clean for years to come.

BC Driver's Abstract Questions

To obtain your BC driving record or “driver’s abstract”, visit the ICBC website and input your full name, license issue date, license serial number, ICBC keyword, and driver’s license number. You can access your record immediately online for free. Your full 5-year BC driving history will be provided.

A BC driver’s abstract report contains your basic personal details, license details, any violations/tickets in the past 5 years, claims/accidents, and current license status. It’s a full record of your driving history used to assess insurance risk and eligibility for certain jobs requiring driving.

Your ICBC driver’s abstract shows any traffic violations, fines, roadside prohibitions etc. Your insurance/claims history is separate and shows details of any past at-fault claims and how they were resolved. Insurance providers can access both records.

In BC, a standard driver’s abstract contains your full driving history for the past 5 years. However, prospective employers and insurance providers can also request and access enhanced abstracts going back further when required.

No. Your province-specific BC driver’s abstract only covers your history within BC. A nationwide record searched by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) contains violations across Canada.

In BC, most traffic violations remain on your driving record for 5 years from the conviction date. You cannot clear individual offences early, but they will automatically drop off your driver’s abstract after 5 years. Major convictions stay on longer.

No. Your BC driver’s abstract only shows violations and actions taken against your driving privilege within BC. However, provinces share some details of convictions through the National Safety Code Driver Record database.

At-fault accidents in BC will remain on your driving record for at least 5 years from the crash date. If you were issued any driving prohibition or sanctions due to the crash, those details may show for longer on your abstract.

No. Due to privacy laws, ICBC cannot provide your driving record to anyone but you, unless you provide signed consent. Exceptions exist for police officers and courts when required. Driving schools also require student consent to access records.

In BC, a clean driving record means no at-fault crashes, traffic convictions, or license suspensions in at least the past 3 years. Minor violations older than 3 years are less concerning to insurers when defining a “clean” record.

No. Your ICBC driver’s abstract is completely separate from any criminal record and does not show up on typical background checks. Only major Criminal Code convictions like impaired driving may overlap between the two records.

In BC’s driver penalty point system, points remain active on your record for 2 years from the date they are assessed against your driving privilege. They then become inactive but still show on your abstract for a further 3 years.

Yes. In BC, insurers can access your full driver’s abstract including details of traffic violations like speeding. Getting multiple tickets or serious convictions can directly increase your car insurance premiums due to now representing higher risk.

If you accumulate 15 or more active penalty points within any 2 year period in BC, you will face an immediate driver’s license suspension. Further driving suspensions occur at accumulation milestones of 18, 20 and 24 points.

If convicted of using an electronic device while driving in BC, you will receive a $368 fine and 4 penalty points. With 8-9 points you enter a driving prohibition warning stage. 15+ points triggers an automatic 1-3 month license suspension.

No. BC’s Driver Improvement Program requires you to pay off certain outstanding fines before being allowed to renew your license. Unpaid fines also allow ICBC to withhold your claims payments until addressed.

For excessive demerits, a first BC driving prohibition is 1-3 months. A second prohibition within 5 years is 6 months. A third prohibition results in your license being cancelled and having to re-test and re-qualify from the Graduated Licensing Program.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

 

Obtaining Your BC Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to request a copy of your BC drivers abstract depending on how quickly you need it and whether you want a paper or electronic copy. The fastest and easiest way is to request it online through ICBC’s driver licensing website. Here are the main options:

 

Request Online

To get your BC drivers abstract electronically online, simply go to ICBC’s website, click on the drivers services tab, and select “Your Driving Record”. From there you can enter your name, birth date, driver’s license number, and ICBC online access code. The cost is free and you will be emailed a PDF copy instantly.

 

In Person

You can also request a copy of your BC drivers abstract in person at any ICBC driver licensing office. Bring your valid BC driver’s license and a second piece of accepted ID. The standard fee is $15 for an electronic copy emailed to you or $25 for a printed copy.

 

By Mail

To have your BC drivers abstract mailed to you, you can print and complete ICBC’s Driver’s Licence Abstract Request Form. Mail it to the address listed along with a cheque or money order for $15 plus tax for an electronic copy or $25 plus tax for a printed version. Processing takes 7-10 business days.

 

Fees

The standard fee for obtaining your BC drivers abstract is $15 for an electronic copy or $25 for a printed copy requested online, in person, or by mail. Additional taxes apply for mailed requests. Faster services are available for insurance or employment purposes at higher costs.

 

What’s Included in a BC Drivers Abstract

A BC drivers abstract contains comprehensive information about your driving record and history. Some of the key details included are:

 

  • Driver’s license details – your full name, date of birth, license number, class of license, issue and expiry dates, and license status.
  • Driving violations and convictions – any tickets, warnings, suspensions, prohibitions, sanctions or penalties.
  • At-fault claims – collisions where you were deemed fully or partially at-fault by ICBC.
  • Convictions – Criminal Code convictions related to the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • Driver medical information – medical conditions that impact your ability to drive safely.
  • Driving history highlights – a 5 year summary of your key driving information.

 

Reviewing your abstract lets you verify that all information is complete and accurate. You can check for errors or omissions which could impact your insurance rates or ability to obtain a driver’s license.

 

How Far Back Does a BC Drivers Abstract Go

A standard BC drivers abstract contains information on traffic violations, license suspensions, and at-fault accidents for the last 5 years. This 5 year lookback period covers most personal drivers abstracts in BC.

However, there are some exceptions when a longer lookback period is required on a BC drivers abstract:

 

  • Commercial drivers abstracts in BC go back as far as 10 years. This provides a more complete record for drivers of large vehicles like semi trucks or buses.
  • If a drivers license was just obtained within less than 5 years, the full history since the license issuance will be provided on the abstract.
  • Serious Criminal Code driving convictions and prohibitions never expire from a BC drivers abstract, no matter how long ago they occurred.

 

So in summary, while 5 years is the standard coverage, commercial drivers and those with serious convictions may have additional history show up outside this period when ordering their drivers abstract in BC.

 

How Often Should I Check My Drivers Abstract

It’s a good idea to check your BC drivers abstract regularly to ensure everything is accurate and up to date. Here are some recommended times to access your driving record:

 

Annually

Get in the habit of checking your abstract once a year. This allows you to review all the information and make sure there are no errors or issues. You can catch any inaccurate violations early and have them corrected.

 

When Shopping for Car Insurance

Your driving record directly impacts your auto insurance rates. Checking your abstract before shopping for a new policy allows you to understand what’s on your driving history. You won’t get any surprises when the insurance company accesses your record.

 

Before a Road Test

If you are preparing to take a road or driving test to get your first license or upgrade your license class, ordering your abstract in advance is wise. Make sure there are no issues that could cause you to fail your test before you show up.

Reviewing your abstract regularly is the best way to stay on top of your driving record. This ensures you understand what violations or convictions are on file, so you can maintain a clean driving history.

 

BC Driver’s License Types

In British Columbia, there are several different classes of driver’s licenses you can obtain depending on the type of vehicle you need to operate.

The classes are:

 

  • Class 5: This is the standard license for passenger vehicles like cars and small trucks (under 11,794 kg). Most drivers have a class 5 license.
  • Class 4: For taxis, ambulances, limousines, and other passenger vehicles seating up to 25 people (including the driver).
  • Class 3: For large passenger vehicles which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Mostly used by bus drivers.
  • Class 2: For large buses which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Ideal for city bus drivers.
  • Class 1: Allows you to operate any motor vehicle including transport trucks and tractor trailers.

 

So in summary, most drivers need a Class 5 license for everyday driving of passenger cars and light trucks. Professional drivers of buses, taxis, and trucks require a higher class of license depending on the size of vehicle they need to operate.

It’s important to get the right class of license you need, otherwise you could be driving illegally if you operate a vehicle you don’t have the proper class for.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

One of the best ways to keep your drivers abstract clean is to avoid violations and at-fault collisions. Here are some tips for maintaining a violation and accident-free driving record in BC:

 

  • Obey all traffic laws and speed limits – Never exceed posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, and yield right-of-way when required.
  • Allow plenty of following distance – Leave at least 2 seconds between your vehicle and the one in front to allow time to react.
  • Limit distractions – Avoid using your phone, eating, or engaging in other activities that take your eyes and focus off the road.
  • Check blind spots – Always check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes or making turns.
  • Practice defensive driving – Be alert, anticipate other drivers’ actions, and be ready to react to hazards on the road.
  • Get enough rest before driving – Drowsy driving can impair your reaction time as much as alcohol.
  • Avoid aggressive driving – Don’t tailgate, gesture angrily, speed up when being passed, or engage in other confrontational behaviours.

 

Driving carefully and defensively is the best way to avoid collisions and traffic violations. This will help keep your BC drivers abstract clean and free of negative entries.

 

Violations that Show on a BC Drivers Abstract

When reviewing your BC drivers abstract, you may come across a variety of violations that will be listed. Some of the common violations that can appear include:

 

Speeding

Exceeding the posted speed limit is one of the most common violations that drivers receive. Any speeding tickets you get will show up on your abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. The number of demerit points you receive depends on how much over the speed limit you were going:

 

  • 1-20 km/h over = 2 points
  • 21-40 km/h over = 3 points
  • 41-60 km/h over = 4 points
  • More than 60 km/h over = excessive speed = 5-6 points

 

DUIs

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a major offense. Impaired driving convictions remain on your driving record for 10 years from the date of conviction. They carry heavy fines, license suspensions, vehicle impoundment, and jail time in addition to 5 penalty points.

 

Distracted Driving

Using a phone or electronic device while driving is against the law. If convicted, these tickets remain on your abstract for 3 years and come with 3 penalty points. Subsequent distracted driving convictions can lead to increased fines and points.

 

At-Fault Accidents

Being involved in an at-fault accident where you are deemed responsible can also lead to penalty points on your driving record. Minor at-fault accidents result in 2 points, while major at-fault accidents lead to 3 points. The number of points depends on the crash details and severity.

 

Driver Penalty Points System in BC

British Columbia utilizes a driver penalty point system to track driving violations and encourage safe driving practices. Points are assigned for various traffic violations and stay on a driver’s record for variable lengths of time depending on the offense.

When a driver is convicted of a driving infraction like speeding, failure to stop at a red light, or reckless driving, a set number of points will be added to their driver’s license record. More severe offenses result in higher points. For example, a speeding ticket may add 3 points while reckless driving could add 5 points.

These points accumulate and remain active for 2 years from the conviction date for most offenses. However, some serious violations like impaired driving can stay on record for up to 10 years. Driver’s with more points on their license are considered higher risk and may see increased insurance rates or have their license suspended if they surpass a certain threshold.

ICBC tracks these active points on every BC driver’s record. Drivers can check their current point total at any time by requesting a copy of their driver’s abstract. This allows you to monitor your driving record and understand the impact points may have on your driving privileges or insurance rates.

While a few points over time is usually not a major concern, maintaining a high total can have serious consequences. That’s why it’s important to always strive to drive safely and avoid violations in BC.

 

Consequences of Multiple Violations on Drivers Abstract

Having multiple violations on your drivers abstract can lead to serious repercussions in British Columbia. The two main consequences are increased insurance premiums and potential license suspension.

Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as higher risk and will charge significantly higher premiums. Each additional minor violation will typically increase your insurance rate by 20-30%, while major violations can increase it by 40% or more. The more violations you accumulate, the higher your insurance costs will rise.

The other major consequence is possible driver’s license suspension. If your drivers abstract shows multiple violations within a short timeframe, ICBC may decide to suspend your license for a period of time. Typically, if you accumulate 3 or more major violations or a combination of 6 minor and major violations within a 2 year period, your license can be suspended for up to 12 months.

The length of suspension will depend on the number and severity of violations. Suspensions generally range from 1-12 months for drivers with multiple violations. You may also be required to undergo remedial training or testing and pay a driver risk premium for up to 3 years after your license is reinstated.

The bottom line is that drivers in BC with numerous violations on their record face steep insurance premium hikes and potential license suspension. That’s why it’s critical to always drive safely, responsibly and violation-free.

 

Getting Violations Removed from BC Drivers Abstract

Having violations on your BC drivers abstract can increase your insurance premiums and make it difficult to find employment that requires driving. While some violations can’t be removed, there are a few ways you may be able to get certain convictions taken off your record:

 

Demonstrating Safe Driving

If you maintain a clean driving record for a set period of time, some violations will eventually drop off your abstract. Minor convictions like speeding tickets will be removed after 3 years of safe driving. More serious offenses can take up to 10 years to be deleted.

 

Driver Improvement Program

Completing an ICBC-approved driver improvement course may allow you to have a conviction removed earlier than the standard timeline. For example, if you take a responsible driver program, a speeding ticket can potentially be deleted after just 2 years instead of 3. Check with ICBC to see if you’re eligible for this option.

While it takes time and effort, having violations removed from your drivers abstract can help lower your insurance rates and open up job prospects. Focus on safe driving habits and take advantage of ICBC’s remediation programs whenever possible.

 

Challenging Information on Your BC Drivers Abstract

If you believe there is incorrect or incomplete information on your BC driver’s abstract, you have the right to dispute it. Here is the process to follow:

 

  1. Review your abstract closely and identify the specific information you wish to dispute. This may be an incorrect date, a traffic violation or accident that did not occur, etc.
  1. Contact ICBC’s Driver Information Services at 1-800-950-1498 to notify them of the incorrect information. Be prepared to provide your driver’s license number and explain what information is inaccurate.
  1. ICBC will open a dispute and investigate the records in question. You may need to provide supporting evidence such as court documents, police reports, receipts, etc. to back up your claim.
  1. If ICBC determines the records are incorrect, they will be amended or deleted from your driving abstract. This can take some time as changes need to be processed through the system.
  1. Request a new copy of your abstract to verify the changes have been made. You can view and print your updated abstract online.

 

If ICBC rejects your dispute claim, you have the right to escalate it further through legal channels. Things like timeframe restrictions and lack of concrete evidence can make successfully disputing items on your abstract challenging. But it is possible in cases of truly incorrect records.

 

Using Your BC Drivers Abstract

Your BC drivers abstract can be a very useful document beyond just checking your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways it can be used:

 

Getting a Job

Many employers will ask for a current copy of your BC drivers abstract, especially if driving is part of the job duties. Truck drivers, delivery drivers, rideshare drivers and more are often required to provide a clean, up-to-date abstract. Having a clean record can improve your chances of getting hired for driving jobs.

 

Lower Insurance

Insurance providers in BC use your driving record as a factor in determining your auto insurance premiums. The fewer tickets and accidents you have, the lower your risk, and generally the lower your insurance rates will be. Maintaining a clean abstract can pay off when your insurance is up for renewal.

 

Crossing the Border

A clean BC drivers abstract can help make crossing the US-Canada border smoother. Border agents may ask to see proof of a clean driving record. A recent abstract with no violations demonstrates you are a safe, lawful driver less likely to cause issues while in the US.

Having an up-to-date copy of your BC drivers abstract can be useful for employment, insurance and travel purposes. It’s a good idea to check it periodically to ensure it remains clean and accurate.

 

Drivers Abstracts in Other Provinces

 

While drivers abstracts in Canada generally provide similar information, there are some key differences across provinces that drivers should be aware of:

Alberta – Driver abstracts can be obtained online or by mail from Alberta Transportation. They contain your basic drivers license information, license status, violations, suspensions, and collisions. Driver abstracts go back 3 years.

Saskatchewan – The Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) provides drivers abstracts. You can request them online or by phone. They show convictions, suspensions and disqualifications over the past 3 years.

Manitoba – Manitoba Public Insurance provides digital driver abstracts instantly online showing your drivers history for the past 3 years. Drivers can also order paper abstracts by mail.

Ontario – You can request your drivers abstract online from ServiceOntario which contains convictions, suspensions and accidents over the past 3 years. An uncertified abstract is free but a certified copy costs a fee.

Quebec – Quebec drivers can obtain their abstract instantly online from the SAAQ. It will contain ticket information, demerit points, suspensions and accidents for the past 10 years.

New Brunswick – Driver abstracts can be requested from Service New Brunswick online, by mail or in person. They contain details on convictions and suspensions over the last 3 years.

Nova Scotia – Nova Scotia drivers can request an abstract online from Access Nova Scotia containing convictions and suspensions from the past 3 years.

While each province handles drivers abstracts a bit differently, they generally provide similar insights into a driver’s history. However, it’s important to know the specific laws in your province regarding how far back your record goes and what shows up on your abstract.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your driver’s abstract is a critical record of your driving history in British Columbia. Having a clean driving record with no violations or accidents is important for several reasons.

Firstly, it can help you qualify for lower auto insurance rates and avoid policy cancellations or non-renewals. Insurance providers view those with clean records as lower risk, translating to savings on premiums.

Additionally, maintaining a clean abstract is essential if you drive for work. Many employers will check your abstract before hiring for positions involving driving, and a poor record can disqualify you.

Lastly, if you are ever involved in an at-fault accident, evidence of past violations or charges for dangerous driving could affect the outcomes and liability. Your abstract provides proof of your driving behavior over time.

For all these reasons, it’s wise to regularly check your BC driver’s abstract and quickly address any inaccuracies. Following the rules of the road, driving defensively, and avoiding violations is the best way to keep your abstract clean for years to come.

BC Driver's Abstract Questions

To obtain your BC driving record or “driver’s abstract”, visit the ICBC website and input your full name, license issue date, license serial number, ICBC keyword, and driver’s license number. You can access your record immediately online for free. Your full 5-year BC driving history will be provided.

A BC driver’s abstract report contains your basic personal details, license details, any violations/tickets in the past 5 years, claims/accidents, and current license status. It’s a full record of your driving history used to assess insurance risk and eligibility for certain jobs requiring driving.

Your ICBC driver’s abstract shows any traffic violations, fines, roadside prohibitions etc. Your insurance/claims history is separate and shows details of any past at-fault claims and how they were resolved. Insurance providers can access both records.

In BC, a standard driver’s abstract contains your full driving history for the past 5 years. However, prospective employers and insurance providers can also request and access enhanced abstracts going back further when required.

No. Your province-specific BC driver’s abstract only covers your history within BC. A nationwide record searched by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) contains violations across Canada.

In BC, most traffic violations remain on your driving record for 5 years from the conviction date. You cannot clear individual offences early, but they will automatically drop off your driver’s abstract after 5 years. Major convictions stay on longer.

No. Your BC driver’s abstract only shows violations and actions taken against your driving privilege within BC. However, provinces share some details of convictions through the National Safety Code Driver Record database.

At-fault accidents in BC will remain on your driving record for at least 5 years from the crash date. If you were issued any driving prohibition or sanctions due to the crash, those details may show for longer on your abstract.

No. Due to privacy laws, ICBC cannot provide your driving record to anyone but you, unless you provide signed consent. Exceptions exist for police officers and courts when required. Driving schools also require student consent to access records.

In BC, a clean driving record means no at-fault crashes, traffic convictions, or license suspensions in at least the past 3 years. Minor violations older than 3 years are less concerning to insurers when defining a “clean” record.

No. Your ICBC driver’s abstract is completely separate from any criminal record and does not show up on typical background checks. Only major Criminal Code convictions like impaired driving may overlap between the two records.

In BC’s driver penalty point system, points remain active on your record for 2 years from the date they are assessed against your driving privilege. They then become inactive but still show on your abstract for a further 3 years.

Yes. In BC, insurers can access your full driver’s abstract including details of traffic violations like speeding. Getting multiple tickets or serious convictions can directly increase your car insurance premiums due to now representing higher risk.

If you accumulate 15 or more active penalty points within any 2 year period in BC, you will face an immediate driver’s license suspension. Further driving suspensions occur at accumulation milestones of 18, 20 and 24 points.

If convicted of using an electronic device while driving in BC, you will receive a $368 fine and 4 penalty points. With 8-9 points you enter a driving prohibition warning stage. 15+ points triggers an automatic 1-3 month license suspension.

No. BC’s Driver Improvement Program requires you to pay off certain outstanding fines before being allowed to renew your license. Unpaid fines also allow ICBC to withhold your claims payments until addressed.

For excessive demerits, a first BC driving prohibition is 1-3 months. A second prohibition within 5 years is 6 months. A third prohibition results in your license being cancelled and having to re-test and re-qualify from the Graduated Licensing Program.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

 

Obtaining Your BC Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to request a copy of your BC drivers abstract depending on how quickly you need it and whether you want a paper or electronic copy. The fastest and easiest way is to request it online through ICBC’s driver licensing website. Here are the main options:

 

Request Online

To get your BC drivers abstract electronically online, simply go to ICBC’s website, click on the drivers services tab, and select “Your Driving Record”. From there you can enter your name, birth date, driver’s license number, and ICBC online access code. The cost is free and you will be emailed a PDF copy instantly.

 

In Person

You can also request a copy of your BC drivers abstract in person at any ICBC driver licensing office. Bring your valid BC driver’s license and a second piece of accepted ID. The standard fee is $15 for an electronic copy emailed to you or $25 for a printed copy.

 

By Mail

To have your BC drivers abstract mailed to you, you can print and complete ICBC’s Driver’s Licence Abstract Request Form. Mail it to the address listed along with a cheque or money order for $15 plus tax for an electronic copy or $25 plus tax for a printed version. Processing takes 7-10 business days.

 

Fees

The standard fee for obtaining your BC drivers abstract is $15 for an electronic copy or $25 for a printed copy requested online, in person, or by mail. Additional taxes apply for mailed requests. Faster services are available for insurance or employment purposes at higher costs.

 

What’s Included in a BC Drivers Abstract

A BC drivers abstract contains comprehensive information about your driving record and history. Some of the key details included are:

 

  • Driver’s license details – your full name, date of birth, license number, class of license, issue and expiry dates, and license status.
  • Driving violations and convictions – any tickets, warnings, suspensions, prohibitions, sanctions or penalties.
  • At-fault claims – collisions where you were deemed fully or partially at-fault by ICBC.
  • Convictions – Criminal Code convictions related to the operation of a motor vehicle.
  • Driver medical information – medical conditions that impact your ability to drive safely.
  • Driving history highlights – a 5 year summary of your key driving information.

 

Reviewing your abstract lets you verify that all information is complete and accurate. You can check for errors or omissions which could impact your insurance rates or ability to obtain a driver’s license.

 

How Far Back Does a BC Drivers Abstract Go

A standard BC drivers abstract contains information on traffic violations, license suspensions, and at-fault accidents for the last 5 years. This 5 year lookback period covers most personal drivers abstracts in BC.

However, there are some exceptions when a longer lookback period is required on a BC drivers abstract:

 

  • Commercial drivers abstracts in BC go back as far as 10 years. This provides a more complete record for drivers of large vehicles like semi trucks or buses.
  • If a drivers license was just obtained within less than 5 years, the full history since the license issuance will be provided on the abstract.
  • Serious Criminal Code driving convictions and prohibitions never expire from a BC drivers abstract, no matter how long ago they occurred.

 

So in summary, while 5 years is the standard coverage, commercial drivers and those with serious convictions may have additional history show up outside this period when ordering their drivers abstract in BC.

 

How Often Should I Check My Drivers Abstract

It’s a good idea to check your BC drivers abstract regularly to ensure everything is accurate and up to date. Here are some recommended times to access your driving record:

 

Annually

Get in the habit of checking your abstract once a year. This allows you to review all the information and make sure there are no errors or issues. You can catch any inaccurate violations early and have them corrected.

 

When Shopping for Car Insurance

Your driving record directly impacts your auto insurance rates. Checking your abstract before shopping for a new policy allows you to understand what’s on your driving history. You won’t get any surprises when the insurance company accesses your record.

 

Before a Road Test

If you are preparing to take a road or driving test to get your first license or upgrade your license class, ordering your abstract in advance is wise. Make sure there are no issues that could cause you to fail your test before you show up.

Reviewing your abstract regularly is the best way to stay on top of your driving record. This ensures you understand what violations or convictions are on file, so you can maintain a clean driving history.

 

BC Driver’s License Types

In British Columbia, there are several different classes of driver’s licenses you can obtain depending on the type of vehicle you need to operate.

The classes are:

 

  • Class 5: This is the standard license for passenger vehicles like cars and small trucks (under 11,794 kg). Most drivers have a class 5 license.
  • Class 4: For taxis, ambulances, limousines, and other passenger vehicles seating up to 25 people (including the driver).
  • Class 3: For large passenger vehicles which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Mostly used by bus drivers.
  • Class 2: For large buses which can transport more than 25 people (including the driver). Ideal for city bus drivers.
  • Class 1: Allows you to operate any motor vehicle including transport trucks and tractor trailers.

 

So in summary, most drivers need a Class 5 license for everyday driving of passenger cars and light trucks. Professional drivers of buses, taxis, and trucks require a higher class of license depending on the size of vehicle they need to operate.

It’s important to get the right class of license you need, otherwise you could be driving illegally if you operate a vehicle you don’t have the proper class for.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

One of the best ways to keep your drivers abstract clean is to avoid violations and at-fault collisions. Here are some tips for maintaining a violation and accident-free driving record in BC:

 

  • Obey all traffic laws and speed limits – Never exceed posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, and yield right-of-way when required.
  • Allow plenty of following distance – Leave at least 2 seconds between your vehicle and the one in front to allow time to react.
  • Limit distractions – Avoid using your phone, eating, or engaging in other activities that take your eyes and focus off the road.
  • Check blind spots – Always check your mirrors and blind spots before changing lanes or making turns.
  • Practice defensive driving – Be alert, anticipate other drivers’ actions, and be ready to react to hazards on the road.
  • Get enough rest before driving – Drowsy driving can impair your reaction time as much as alcohol.
  • Avoid aggressive driving – Don’t tailgate, gesture angrily, speed up when being passed, or engage in other confrontational behaviours.

 

Driving carefully and defensively is the best way to avoid collisions and traffic violations. This will help keep your BC drivers abstract clean and free of negative entries.

 

Violations that Show on a BC Drivers Abstract

When reviewing your BC drivers abstract, you may come across a variety of violations that will be listed. Some of the common violations that can appear include:

 

Speeding

Exceeding the posted speed limit is one of the most common violations that drivers receive. Any speeding tickets you get will show up on your abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. The number of demerit points you receive depends on how much over the speed limit you were going:

 

  • 1-20 km/h over = 2 points
  • 21-40 km/h over = 3 points
  • 41-60 km/h over = 4 points
  • More than 60 km/h over = excessive speed = 5-6 points

 

DUIs

Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is a major offense. Impaired driving convictions remain on your driving record for 10 years from the date of conviction. They carry heavy fines, license suspensions, vehicle impoundment, and jail time in addition to 5 penalty points.

 

Distracted Driving

Using a phone or electronic device while driving is against the law. If convicted, these tickets remain on your abstract for 3 years and come with 3 penalty points. Subsequent distracted driving convictions can lead to increased fines and points.

 

At-Fault Accidents

Being involved in an at-fault accident where you are deemed responsible can also lead to penalty points on your driving record. Minor at-fault accidents result in 2 points, while major at-fault accidents lead to 3 points. The number of points depends on the crash details and severity.

 

Driver Penalty Points System in BC

British Columbia utilizes a driver penalty point system to track driving violations and encourage safe driving practices. Points are assigned for various traffic violations and stay on a driver’s record for variable lengths of time depending on the offense.

When a driver is convicted of a driving infraction like speeding, failure to stop at a red light, or reckless driving, a set number of points will be added to their driver’s license record. More severe offenses result in higher points. For example, a speeding ticket may add 3 points while reckless driving could add 5 points.

These points accumulate and remain active for 2 years from the conviction date for most offenses. However, some serious violations like impaired driving can stay on record for up to 10 years. Driver’s with more points on their license are considered higher risk and may see increased insurance rates or have their license suspended if they surpass a certain threshold.

ICBC tracks these active points on every BC driver’s record. Drivers can check their current point total at any time by requesting a copy of their driver’s abstract. This allows you to monitor your driving record and understand the impact points may have on your driving privileges or insurance rates.

While a few points over time is usually not a major concern, maintaining a high total can have serious consequences. That’s why it’s important to always strive to drive safely and avoid violations in BC.

 

Consequences of Multiple Violations on Drivers Abstract

Having multiple violations on your drivers abstract can lead to serious repercussions in British Columbia. The two main consequences are increased insurance premiums and potential license suspension.

Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as higher risk and will charge significantly higher premiums. Each additional minor violation will typically increase your insurance rate by 20-30%, while major violations can increase it by 40% or more. The more violations you accumulate, the higher your insurance costs will rise.

The other major consequence is possible driver’s license suspension. If your drivers abstract shows multiple violations within a short timeframe, ICBC may decide to suspend your license for a period of time. Typically, if you accumulate 3 or more major violations or a combination of 6 minor and major violations within a 2 year period, your license can be suspended for up to 12 months.

The length of suspension will depend on the number and severity of violations. Suspensions generally range from 1-12 months for drivers with multiple violations. You may also be required to undergo remedial training or testing and pay a driver risk premium for up to 3 years after your license is reinstated.

The bottom line is that drivers in BC with numerous violations on their record face steep insurance premium hikes and potential license suspension. That’s why it’s critical to always drive safely, responsibly and violation-free.

 

Getting Violations Removed from BC Drivers Abstract

Having violations on your BC drivers abstract can increase your insurance premiums and make it difficult to find employment that requires driving. While some violations can’t be removed, there are a few ways you may be able to get certain convictions taken off your record:

 

Demonstrating Safe Driving

If you maintain a clean driving record for a set period of time, some violations will eventually drop off your abstract. Minor convictions like speeding tickets will be removed after 3 years of safe driving. More serious offenses can take up to 10 years to be deleted.

 

Driver Improvement Program

Completing an ICBC-approved driver improvement course may allow you to have a conviction removed earlier than the standard timeline. For example, if you take a responsible driver program, a speeding ticket can potentially be deleted after just 2 years instead of 3. Check with ICBC to see if you’re eligible for this option.

While it takes time and effort, having violations removed from your drivers abstract can help lower your insurance rates and open up job prospects. Focus on safe driving habits and take advantage of ICBC’s remediation programs whenever possible.

 

Challenging Information on Your BC Drivers Abstract

If you believe there is incorrect or incomplete information on your BC driver’s abstract, you have the right to dispute it. Here is the process to follow:

 

  1. Review your abstract closely and identify the specific information you wish to dispute. This may be an incorrect date, a traffic violation or accident that did not occur, etc.
  1. Contact ICBC’s Driver Information Services at 1-800-950-1498 to notify them of the incorrect information. Be prepared to provide your driver’s license number and explain what information is inaccurate.
  1. ICBC will open a dispute and investigate the records in question. You may need to provide supporting evidence such as court documents, police reports, receipts, etc. to back up your claim.
  1. If ICBC determines the records are incorrect, they will be amended or deleted from your driving abstract. This can take some time as changes need to be processed through the system.
  1. Request a new copy of your abstract to verify the changes have been made. You can view and print your updated abstract online.

 

If ICBC rejects your dispute claim, you have the right to escalate it further through legal channels. Things like timeframe restrictions and lack of concrete evidence can make successfully disputing items on your abstract challenging. But it is possible in cases of truly incorrect records.

 

Using Your BC Drivers Abstract

Your BC drivers abstract can be a very useful document beyond just checking your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways it can be used:

 

Getting a Job

Many employers will ask for a current copy of your BC drivers abstract, especially if driving is part of the job duties. Truck drivers, delivery drivers, rideshare drivers and more are often required to provide a clean, up-to-date abstract. Having a clean record can improve your chances of getting hired for driving jobs.

 

Lower Insurance

Insurance providers in BC use your driving record as a factor in determining your auto insurance premiums. The fewer tickets and accidents you have, the lower your risk, and generally the lower your insurance rates will be. Maintaining a clean abstract can pay off when your insurance is up for renewal.

 

Crossing the Border

A clean BC drivers abstract can help make crossing the US-Canada border smoother. Border agents may ask to see proof of a clean driving record. A recent abstract with no violations demonstrates you are a safe, lawful driver less likely to cause issues while in the US.

Having an up-to-date copy of your BC drivers abstract can be useful for employment, insurance and travel purposes. It’s a good idea to check it periodically to ensure it remains clean and accurate.

 

Drivers Abstracts in Other Provinces

 

While drivers abstracts in Canada generally provide similar information, there are some key differences across provinces that drivers should be aware of:

Alberta – Driver abstracts can be obtained online or by mail from Alberta Transportation. They contain your basic drivers license information, license status, violations, suspensions, and collisions. Driver abstracts go back 3 years.

Saskatchewan – The Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) provides drivers abstracts. You can request them online or by phone. They show convictions, suspensions and disqualifications over the past 3 years.

Manitoba – Manitoba Public Insurance provides digital driver abstracts instantly online showing your drivers history for the past 3 years. Drivers can also order paper abstracts by mail.

Ontario – You can request your drivers abstract online from ServiceOntario which contains convictions, suspensions and accidents over the past 3 years. An uncertified abstract is free but a certified copy costs a fee.

Quebec – Quebec drivers can obtain their abstract instantly online from the SAAQ. It will contain ticket information, demerit points, suspensions and accidents for the past 10 years.

New Brunswick – Driver abstracts can be requested from Service New Brunswick online, by mail or in person. They contain details on convictions and suspensions over the last 3 years.

Nova Scotia – Nova Scotia drivers can request an abstract online from Access Nova Scotia containing convictions and suspensions from the past 3 years.

While each province handles drivers abstracts a bit differently, they generally provide similar insights into a driver’s history. However, it’s important to know the specific laws in your province regarding how far back your record goes and what shows up on your abstract.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your driver’s abstract is a critical record of your driving history in British Columbia. Having a clean driving record with no violations or accidents is important for several reasons.

Firstly, it can help you qualify for lower auto insurance rates and avoid policy cancellations or non-renewals. Insurance providers view those with clean records as lower risk, translating to savings on premiums.

Additionally, maintaining a clean abstract is essential if you drive for work. Many employers will check your abstract before hiring for positions involving driving, and a poor record can disqualify you.

Lastly, if you are ever involved in an at-fault accident, evidence of past violations or charges for dangerous driving could affect the outcomes and liability. Your abstract provides proof of your driving behavior over time.

For all these reasons, it’s wise to regularly check your BC driver’s abstract and quickly address any inaccuracies. Following the rules of the road, driving defensively, and avoiding violations is the best way to keep your abstract clean for years to come.

Get Approved Today

See if you qualify in under 60 seconds

BC Driver's Abstract Questions

To obtain your BC driving record or “driver’s abstract”, visit the ICBC website and input your full name, license issue date, license serial number, ICBC keyword, and driver’s license number. You can access your record immediately online for free. Your full 5-year BC driving history will be provided.

A BC driver’s abstract report contains your basic personal details, license details, any violations/tickets in the past 5 years, claims/accidents, and current license status. It’s a full record of your driving history used to assess insurance risk and eligibility for certain jobs requiring driving.

Your ICBC driver’s abstract shows any traffic violations, fines, roadside prohibitions etc. Your insurance/claims history is separate and shows details of any past at-fault claims and how they were resolved. Insurance providers can access both records.

In BC, a standard driver’s abstract contains your full driving history for the past 5 years. However, prospective employers and insurance providers can also request and access enhanced abstracts going back further when required.

No. Your province-specific BC driver’s abstract only covers your history within BC. A nationwide record searched by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) contains violations across Canada.

In BC, most traffic violations remain on your driving record for 5 years from the conviction date. You cannot clear individual offences early, but they will automatically drop off your driver’s abstract after 5 years. Major convictions stay on longer.

No. Your BC driver’s abstract only shows violations and actions taken against your driving privilege within BC. However, provinces share some details of convictions through the National Safety Code Driver Record database.

At-fault accidents in BC will remain on your driving record for at least 5 years from the crash date. If you were issued any driving prohibition or sanctions due to the crash, those details may show for longer on your abstract.

No. Due to privacy laws, ICBC cannot provide your driving record to anyone but you, unless you provide signed consent. Exceptions exist for police officers and courts when required. Driving schools also require student consent to access records.

In BC, a clean driving record means no at-fault crashes, traffic convictions, or license suspensions in at least the past 3 years. Minor violations older than 3 years are less concerning to insurers when defining a “clean” record.

No. Your ICBC driver’s abstract is completely separate from any criminal record and does not show up on typical background checks. Only major Criminal Code convictions like impaired driving may overlap between the two records.

In BC’s driver penalty point system, points remain active on your record for 2 years from the date they are assessed against your driving privilege. They then become inactive but still show on your abstract for a further 3 years.

Yes. In BC, insurers can access your full driver’s abstract including details of traffic violations like speeding. Getting multiple tickets or serious convictions can directly increase your car insurance premiums due to now representing higher risk.

If you accumulate 15 or more active penalty points within any 2 year period in BC, you will face an immediate driver’s license suspension. Further driving suspensions occur at accumulation milestones of 18, 20 and 24 points.

If convicted of using an electronic device while driving in BC, you will receive a $368 fine and 4 penalty points. With 8-9 points you enter a driving prohibition warning stage. 15+ points triggers an automatic 1-3 month license suspension.

No. BC’s Driver Improvement Program requires you to pay off certain outstanding fines before being allowed to renew your license. Unpaid fines also allow ICBC to withhold your claims payments until addressed.

For excessive demerits, a first BC driving prohibition is 1-3 months. A second prohibition within 5 years is 6 months. A third prohibition results in your license being cancelled and having to re-test and re-qualify from the Graduated Licensing Program.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

If expired less than 2 years, it can be renewed immediately if you still meet vision and other standards. If expired more than 2 years, you must re-take knowledge and road tests and restart the Graduated Licensing Program before your license privileges will be restored.

Get Approved Today

See if you qualify in under 60 seconds