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Ontario Driver's Abstract

Ontario

Your driving record follows you wherever you go. Any time you apply for car insurance or renew your license, your driving history comes into play. Insurance companies and government agencies rely on driver abstracts to assess your risk behind the wheel.

A driver’s abstract is an official record of your driving history. It includes details like license suspensions, at-fault accidents, and traffic violations. Having a clean driving record can lead to lower insurance rates and make getting or renewing your license easier.

Your Ontario driver’s abstract provides a snapshot of your driving behaviour over the past few years. Understanding what’s in your driving record and how to dispute errors can help you keep your abstract clean. Regularly checking your own abstract is the best way to ensure accuracy and identify issues early on.

This guide will cover everything you need to know about obtaining, reading, and maintaining your Ontario driver abstract. Let’s start with the basics.

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What is an Ontario Driver’s Abstract?

An Ontario driver’s abstract, also known as a driver’s record, driving record, or driver’s licence record, is an official document that lists a licensed driver’s history. It provides details on driving offences, collisions, and license suspensions over a set period of time.

There are a few different types of abstracts available in Ontario:

 

  • 3 Year Uncertified Abstract – This contains all driving convictions, suspensions, and collisions registered over the last 3 years. It is used for personal and employment purposes.
  • 3 Year Certified Abstract – Same as above but certified with an official seal to confirm its authenticity. Often used for legal proceedings.
  • 5 Year Uncertified Abstract – Provides 5 years of records instead of 3.
  • Driver Record Search – Confirms license validity and status. Includes driver education completion.
  • Driver Licence History Search – Validates license authenticity. Shows license number, class, status, expiry date and more.

 

The government uses abstracts to monitor drivers and identify those with poor records. Drivers can also request their own abstracts to review their history and check for errors.

 

Why Check Your Driving Record?

There are several important reasons why drivers in Ontario should periodically check their driving record:

Insurance Purposes

Car insurance companies will look at your driving abstract when determining your premiums. Too many tickets, at-fault accidents, or other violations can result in much higher insurance rates. Reviewing your abstract lets you know what violations insurance companies will see when assessing your risk.

Employment Purposes

Many employers, especially for driving positions, will ask for a copy of your abstract. This allows them to verify any licence suspensions, DWIs, reckless driving charges, or other serious offenses. A poor driving history could disqualify you for certain jobs.

Monitor and Improve Your Record

Checking your own record lets you monitor any active demerit points, convictions, or suspensions. This knowledge allows you time to improve your driving skills, take driving courses, or simply drive safer before facing penalties. Monitoring your record helps hold you accountable.

Avoid Surprises

By reviewing your own record, you avoid any unpleasant surprises if pulled over or at renewal time. You can proactively take steps to improve your driving and correct any issues.

In summary, regularly checking your own driving abstract is crucial for keeping insurance costs low, maintaining employability, improving driving habits, and avoiding penalties or suspensions.

 

How to Get Your Ontario Driver Abstract

There are a few different ways you can obtain a copy of your Ontario driver’s abstract:

 

Order Online

The fastest and most convenient way is to order your abstract online through the Ontario Ministry of Transportation’s website. You can purchase either a 3-year uncertified abstract for $12 or a 3-year certified abstract for $18. The certified abstract will have an official seal while the uncertified does not.

To order online, go to the Ministry of Transportation website and complete the online order form. You will need your driver’s licence number, date of birth, and payment information. Online orders are usually processed within 1 business day.

 

Order by Mail

You can also order an abstract by mailing in a request form along with payment. Download the Driver Record Request form and mail it with a cheque or money order to the address listed on the form.

Mailed requests take about 15 business days to be processed once received by the Ministry.

 

In-Person

Finally, you can visit a ServiceOntario location and order an abstract in-person. You will need to provide valid ID. The fee is the same as ordering online.

You will receive your abstract right away if ordering in-person. This is the fastest option if you need your abstract immediately.

 

What’s Included in an Ontario Driver Abstract

An Ontario driver’s abstract contains important details about your driving record over the past several years. Here are some of the key items included on your abstract:

 

  • Driver information like your name, license number, address, and date of birth
  • The license classes you hold (e.g. G, G1, G2, M, M1, M2)
  • License status and original issue date
  • Expiry date of your license
  • Details of any collisions you’ve been involved in
  • Convictions and fines for traffic violations like speeding, careless driving, failure to stop, etc.
  • Failing a roadside sobriety test
  • License suspensions, both current and previous
  • Medical suspensions
  • Accumulated demerit points and current total
  • Whether you’ve completed a remedial drivers education course

 

Having all this information in one place provides a comprehensive snapshot of your history as a driver in Ontario over the past several years. Checking your abstract regularly is important to ensure the information is up-to-date and accurate.

 

How Long Violations Stay on Your Record

The length of time a violation remains on your Ontario driving record depends on the severity of the incident. Here’s an overview of how long some common violations typically stay on your abstract:

 

Major Convictions

Major convictions like impaired driving, failing to stop after an accident, and street racing remain on your driver’s record for 10 years from the date of conviction.

 

Serious Convictions

Violations like careless driving and excessive speeding over 50 km/hr over the limit stay on your abstract for 6 years.

 

Minor Convictions

Minor traffic violations like speeding under 50 km/hr over the limit, improper turns, and disobeying traffic signals stay on your record for 3 years.

 

Demerit Points

Demerit points remain on your driving record for 2 years from the conviction date. Accumulating too many points can lead to increased insurance rates or license suspension.

It’s important to note that even after a conviction drops off your abstract, it may still be considered by insurance companies when calculating your premiums.

 

Tips for Checking Your Abstract

When it comes to ordering and reviewing your driving abstract, here are some tips to keep in mind:

 

  • Order online for fastest delivery. You can get an uncertified abstract emailed to you right away by using a third party service. Going through the MTO can take 15 business days.
  • Review annually. Check your abstract at least once a year to ensure there are no errors or surprises.
  • Make corrections promptly. If there is an error on your abstract, contact the MTO right away to have it corrected.
  • Note violations about to drop off. Violations stay on your record for 3 years, so keep an eye on when they will disappear.
  • Check different record types. Your driver’s license history, CVOR abstract, and driver record all provide useful information from different perspectives.
  • Save copies. Whenever you order a new abstract, save a copy for your records in case you need to dispute something in the future.
  • Be prepared if ordering in person. Have your license ready when ordering an abstract in person at a ServiceOntario location.
  • Understand codes and abbreviations. Make sure you understand all the codes and shorthand on your abstract so you know exactly what each violation refers to.
  • Double check your info. Verify that the driver details like name, license number and address are accurate on your abstract.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

Having a clean driving record with no tickets, collisions or infractions can make a big difference when it comes to insurance rates and employability for jobs that require driving. Here are some tips for keeping your Ontario driver’s abstract clean:

 

Drive Safely and Legally

The best way to avoid violations and incidents showing up on your record is to always drive safely and legally. Follow posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, yield properly, and signal all turns and lane changes. Don’t drink and drive or drive while impaired. Making good decisions while behind the wheel can help keep your abstract clean.

 

Check Your Driver Abstract Regularly

Get into the habit of ordering and reviewing your own driver abstract every 6-12 months. This allows you to monitor your record and ensure there are no errors. If a ticket or infraction shows up that you weren’t aware of, you can dispute it immediately while the details are still fresh.

 

Take Defensive Driving Courses

Consider taking an approved defensive driving course, which can make you eligible for a small reduction in insurance premiums. Refreshing your knowledge on safe driving techniques can help avoid collisions and incidents that lead to violations.

 

Wait Out Serious Violations

If you do get cited for a major violation like impaired driving, accept the consequences and wait for the charge to eventually clear from your abstract. Never drive impaired or illegally again. Mistakes can be overcome if you show a commitment to driving safely going forward.

 

Consequences of a Poor Driving Record

Having multiple tickets, collisions, or other violations on your driving record can lead to serious consequences. Your driving abstract provides a summary of your history on the road, which can impact your ability to drive legally as well as your insurance rates and employment prospects.

If you accumulate too many demerit points from offenses like speeding, you may face license suspension or additional penalties. The number of demerit points that lead to a suspension depends on whether you have a full G or M license versus a probationary license.

For fully licensed drivers:

 

  • 15+ points within 2 years = 30 day license suspension
  • 15+ points within 3 years = 60 day suspension
  • 15+ points within 4 years = 90 day suspension
  • 30+ points within 2 years = 60 day suspension
  • 45+ points within 3 years = 90 day suspension

 

For drivers with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 license:

 

  • 5+ points = 30 day suspension
  • 10+ points within 5 years = 90 day suspension

 

If your license is suspended, you will need to pay a $150 reinstatement fee plus a $20 license fee when eligibility is restored. You are not allowed to drive during the suspension period.

Multiple tickets and collisions will also cause your car insurance rates to skyrocket. Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as high-risk and will raise premiums significantly. Some insurers may even decline to renew your policy.

Having a poor driving record can also negatively impact your career prospects and current employment, especially for jobs that involve driving. Employers will often review driver abstracts to assess applicants, and risky driving histories can remove you from consideration for many positions.

The consequences of unsafe driving habits extend well beyond the original ticket or accident. It’s critical to examine your abstract regularly and take steps to improve it over time. Understanding the lasting impacts of violations will help motivate safe driving behaviours too.

 

Disputing Errors on Your Abstract

If you notice any errors on your driving record, such as an incorrect license number, wrong address, tickets you never received, or accidents that were not your fault, you have the right to dispute them. Here is the process for disputing mistakes on your Ontario driving abstract:

 

  1. Gather supporting documents – This may include proof of insurance, police reports, court documents, or any other evidence showing the error. The more documentation you have, the better.
  1. Call ServiceOntario – Explain to the representative that you need to dispute an error on your driving record. They can start a file and investigation into the discrepancy.
  1. Submit dispute form – Print and fill out the “Request/Notification of Change” form on the ServiceOntario website. Attach your supporting documents.
  1. Mail to address – Send the completed dispute form and documents by registered mail to the address listed on the form.
  1. Wait for response – The Ministry should mail you a letter within 4-6 weeks confirming if they updated your driving record or not. Mistakes can take time to fix.
  1. Order new abstract – Once resolved, order a new copy of your driving abstract to verify the change was made.

Following this dispute process correctly gives you the best chance of removing any inaccuracies from your driving record. Pay close attention to response deadlines if the Ministry requests more information from you. Being persistent usually pays off in getting your abstract corrected.

 

Options After License Suspension

Having your license suspended can greatly impact your ability to drive legally and get around. Here are some steps you can take after receiving a license suspension in Ontario:

 

Getting Your License Back After Suspension

If your license was suspended due to unpaid fines or penalties, you’ll need to resolve those first before being able to restore your license. Once any outstanding issues are cleared, you can re-apply for your license through the Ministry of Transportation.

For suspensions related to medical conditions, you’ll need to provide updated medical reports showing you meet the requirements to drive again. This may involve retaking vision, knowledge or road tests.

If your license was suspended due to demerit points, you’ll need to wait out the length of the suspension. For first suspensions, this is usually 3 months. Once the suspension period ends, your license is automatically reinstated.

 

Using an Interlock Device

After certain alcohol-related convictions, you may be able to drive again sooner by having an approved ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle. This breathalyzer unit prevents you from starting your vehicle if alcohol is detected on your breath.

Interlock devices allow you to restore your license and driving privileges while also monitoring your alcohol consumption. You’ll need to pay installation and monthly maintenance fees to use one.

 

Steps to Restore Your License

The general steps to get your license back after a suspension include:

 

  • Resolving any outstanding fines, penalties or medical/vision issues
  • Completing remedial programs if required, like drinking driver programs
  • Applying for license reinstatement and paying the fee
  • Passing any required knowledge or road tests
  • Using an interlock device if applicable
  • Maintaining a clean record during your suspension period

 

It’s important to follow all the proper steps when trying to restore your driving privileges after a suspension. This shows you’ve learned from your mistakes and are ready to comply with all road safety laws going forward.

 

Comparing Ontario to Other Provinces

There are some key differences between getting your driving record in Ontario versus other Canadian provinces. Here’s what you need to know if you’re moving from or planning to drive in other parts of the country:

In British Columbia, you can request your 3-year driver’s abstract online from ICBC for $15. An abstract with your full history costs $30. Your record includes any penalties, prohibitions, collisions and convictions.

In Alberta, you can get your uncertified 3-year record online instantly for $11.95. A 5-year certified abstract is $17.95. Your Alberta record shows suspensions, disqualifications, convictions and collisions.

Quebec provides access to your driver’s abstract online, which includes any demerit points, suspensions or criminal code convictions from the past 10 years. There is no charge to view your abstract.

The Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI) handle abstracts differently, charging fees in person at Access Nova Scotia centers instead of online. Newfoundland and Labrador provides digital records free of charge.

The key takeaway is that each province has its own system, timeline and fees for obtaining records. While there are differences, the essential information on tickets, accidents and suspensions is standardized across Canada.

 

Conclusion

In summary, an Ontario driver’s abstract is an important record that provides details about your driving history. Checking your abstract regularly allows you to monitor your record, dispute any errors, and maintain a clean driving history.

Key points to remember include:

 

  • Driver abstracts can be obtained online, by mail, or in-person via ServiceOntario
  • Abstracts contain licence info, violations, convictions, suspensions, and collisions
  • Violations stay on your record for 3 years from conviction date
  • Multiple major violations can lead to escalating sanctions
  • Always check your abstract after collisions or violations
  • Dispute any errors on your record promptly

 

By frequently reviewing your driving record, driving safely and obeying all rules of the road, you can keep your abstract clean and avoid consequences like increased insurance costs. Remember to always check your abstract after collisions, violations or licence upgrades to ensure it remains accurate.

Ontario Driver's Abstract Questions

An Ontario driver’s abstract is an official record of your driving history issued by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). It lists details like your license information, any collisions you’ve been involved in, driving convictions like tickets and suspensions, and your current number of demerit points. Insurance companies and some employers often request abstracts to verify your driving record.

You can easily order your uncertified 3-year Ontario driver’s abstract online from the MTO website. The fee is $12. For a certified abstract with an official seal, you must mail in a request or visit a ServiceOntario location in person. Certified abstracts cost $18 and take 6-8 weeks to receive by mail.

Your Ontario driver’s abstract will include your license details like class, status, and expiry date. It also lists any collisions, convictions, fines or suspensions over the past 3 years, including dates and locations. The number of demerit points accumulated and remaining on your license will also be shown.

Most entries remain on your Ontario driving record for at least 3 years from the date of conviction. Certain Criminal Code convictions stay on your record for 10 years. Failures to appear in court and some suspensions can show for 6 years. Once the retention period ends, items are automatically removed from your abstract.

To access your full 5-year driving history in Ontario, you need to request a uncertified driver record search from the Ministry of Transportation. The extended abstract costs $20 and takes 6-8 weeks to receive by mail. 5-year abstracts are used for employment driving positions.

Unfortunately, Ontario does not currently offer an online service for drivers to instantly view their own abstracts. Only authorized organizations can access and request driving records electronically. As a regular driver, you need to order an official abstract by mail or in person. Some private companies offer fast online abstracts.

Ordering your basic 3-year uncertified Ontario driver’s abstract online costs $12. The fee for a mailed certified abstract with a seal is $18. For commercial drivers, uncertified CVOR abstracts are $5 and certified CVOR abstracts are $10. Extended 5-year uncertified abstracts cost $20.

The most common reasons for requesting your driving record are for insurance purposes, pre-employment screening for driving positions, and after you’ve applied for financing a new vehicle. Prospective landlords may also ask for an abstract to assess tenant applications.

No, an out-of-province driving abstract is not accepted for licensing purposes if moving to Ontario. You’ll need to exchange your valid driver’s license from another province for an Ontario driver’s license within 60 days. Your previous driving record will be transferred during this process.

An Ontario driver’s record refers to your complete history stored in the MTO database. An abstract is an official document summarizing details from your record over a set period, usually 3 years. Abstracts are used to share driving information with third parties like insurance companies.

If you order an uncertified abstract online, it’s delivered to your email instantly. Certified abstracts ordered by mail take about 6-8 weeks to receive. For 5-year abstracts and driver record searches, expect mailing delays of up to 2 months before getting your official driving history report.

Yes, uncertified 3-year and 5-year driver abstracts can be ordered online and delivered straight to your email, usually in a matter of seconds. However, only physical certified abstracts with a seal are available by mail in Ontario. No digital or electronic versions exist for certified abstracts.

Standard uncertified abstracts show your driving record for the previous 3 years. For a longer history, 5-year uncertified abstracts are available capturing entries over the past 5 years. Certain convictions can stay on your Ontario record for 6-10 years, but won’t show on abstracts after the 3 or 5 year reporting periods.

Only authorized people and organizations can legally access your driving information. This includes police, courts, insurance companies with consent, doctors for medical reporting, and government bodies like the MTO. Prospective employers can also access driving records for commercial driving positions with consent.

No. Due to privacy laws, only the licence holder themselves can request access to their own driving record in Ontario. Insurance companies can only retrieve your abstract with direct, documented consent. Exceptions may occur during legal proceedings with a warrant or subpoena.

Ontario drivers start with zero demerit points. As you accumulate convictions, you get demerit points added to your license based on the offence. For example, speeding adds 3 points. Once you reach 15 points in a 2-year period, your license will be automatically suspended.

Demerit points remain active on your Ontario driving record for 2 years from the date of conviction. After the 2 year period, the associated demerit points expire and are removed from your license. However, the convictions themselves stay on your abstract for at least 3 years.

The Driver’s Licence History Search is an online service that displays basic status details about an Ontario driver’s license, rather than a full record. It shows license class, expiry date, beginner driver education status, and administrative changes like reinstatements. It does not give driving history details.

Yes, you can share your uncertified abstract with third parties like potential employers and landlords. However, it’s illegal for them to share your private driving information further without documented consent. Certified abstracts with a seal are more official and also accepted by insurance providers.

Industry experts typically recommend checking your own Ontario driving abstract at least once a year. This allows you to review your record for accuracy, ensure any expired convictions have been removed, and check details if shopping for auto insurance renewals or applying for driving jobs.

 

What is an Ontario Driver’s Abstract?

An Ontario driver’s abstract, also known as a driver’s record, driving record, or driver’s licence record, is an official document that lists a licensed driver’s history. It provides details on driving offences, collisions, and license suspensions over a set period of time.

There are a few different types of abstracts available in Ontario:

 

  • 3 Year Uncertified Abstract – This contains all driving convictions, suspensions, and collisions registered over the last 3 years. It is used for personal and employment purposes.
  • 3 Year Certified Abstract – Same as above but certified with an official seal to confirm its authenticity. Often used for legal proceedings.
  • 5 Year Uncertified Abstract – Provides 5 years of records instead of 3.
  • Driver Record Search – Confirms license validity and status. Includes driver education completion.
  • Driver Licence History Search – Validates license authenticity. Shows license number, class, status, expiry date and more.

 

The government uses abstracts to monitor drivers and identify those with poor records. Drivers can also request their own abstracts to review their history and check for errors.

 

Why Check Your Driving Record?

There are several important reasons why drivers in Ontario should periodically check their driving record:

Insurance Purposes

Car insurance companies will look at your driving abstract when determining your premiums. Too many tickets, at-fault accidents, or other violations can result in much higher insurance rates. Reviewing your abstract lets you know what violations insurance companies will see when assessing your risk.

Employment Purposes

Many employers, especially for driving positions, will ask for a copy of your abstract. This allows them to verify any licence suspensions, DWIs, reckless driving charges, or other serious offenses. A poor driving history could disqualify you for certain jobs.

Monitor and Improve Your Record

Checking your own record lets you monitor any active demerit points, convictions, or suspensions. This knowledge allows you time to improve your driving skills, take driving courses, or simply drive safer before facing penalties. Monitoring your record helps hold you accountable.

Avoid Surprises

By reviewing your own record, you avoid any unpleasant surprises if pulled over or at renewal time. You can proactively take steps to improve your driving and correct any issues.

In summary, regularly checking your own driving abstract is crucial for keeping insurance costs low, maintaining employability, improving driving habits, and avoiding penalties or suspensions.

 

How to Get Your Ontario Driver Abstract

There are a few different ways you can obtain a copy of your Ontario driver’s abstract:

 

Order Online

The fastest and most convenient way is to order your abstract online through the Ontario Ministry of Transportation’s website. You can purchase either a 3-year uncertified abstract for $12 or a 3-year certified abstract for $18. The certified abstract will have an official seal while the uncertified does not.

To order online, go to the Ministry of Transportation website and complete the online order form. You will need your driver’s licence number, date of birth, and payment information. Online orders are usually processed within 1 business day.

 

Order by Mail

You can also order an abstract by mailing in a request form along with payment. Download the Driver Record Request form and mail it with a cheque or money order to the address listed on the form.

Mailed requests take about 15 business days to be processed once received by the Ministry.

 

In-Person

Finally, you can visit a ServiceOntario location and order an abstract in-person. You will need to provide valid ID. The fee is the same as ordering online.

You will receive your abstract right away if ordering in-person. This is the fastest option if you need your abstract immediately.

 

What’s Included in an Ontario Driver Abstract

An Ontario driver’s abstract contains important details about your driving record over the past several years. Here are some of the key items included on your abstract:

 

  • Driver information like your name, license number, address, and date of birth
  • The license classes you hold (e.g. G, G1, G2, M, M1, M2)
  • License status and original issue date
  • Expiry date of your license
  • Details of any collisions you’ve been involved in
  • Convictions and fines for traffic violations like speeding, careless driving, failure to stop, etc.
  • Failing a roadside sobriety test
  • License suspensions, both current and previous
  • Medical suspensions
  • Accumulated demerit points and current total
  • Whether you’ve completed a remedial drivers education course

 

Having all this information in one place provides a comprehensive snapshot of your history as a driver in Ontario over the past several years. Checking your abstract regularly is important to ensure the information is up-to-date and accurate.

 

How Long Violations Stay on Your Record

The length of time a violation remains on your Ontario driving record depends on the severity of the incident. Here’s an overview of how long some common violations typically stay on your abstract:

 

Major Convictions

Major convictions like impaired driving, failing to stop after an accident, and street racing remain on your driver’s record for 10 years from the date of conviction.

 

Serious Convictions

Violations like careless driving and excessive speeding over 50 km/hr over the limit stay on your abstract for 6 years.

 

Minor Convictions

Minor traffic violations like speeding under 50 km/hr over the limit, improper turns, and disobeying traffic signals stay on your record for 3 years.

 

Demerit Points

Demerit points remain on your driving record for 2 years from the conviction date. Accumulating too many points can lead to increased insurance rates or license suspension.

It’s important to note that even after a conviction drops off your abstract, it may still be considered by insurance companies when calculating your premiums.

 

Tips for Checking Your Abstract

When it comes to ordering and reviewing your driving abstract, here are some tips to keep in mind:

 

  • Order online for fastest delivery. You can get an uncertified abstract emailed to you right away by using a third party service. Going through the MTO can take 15 business days.
  • Review annually. Check your abstract at least once a year to ensure there are no errors or surprises.
  • Make corrections promptly. If there is an error on your abstract, contact the MTO right away to have it corrected.
  • Note violations about to drop off. Violations stay on your record for 3 years, so keep an eye on when they will disappear.
  • Check different record types. Your driver’s license history, CVOR abstract, and driver record all provide useful information from different perspectives.
  • Save copies. Whenever you order a new abstract, save a copy for your records in case you need to dispute something in the future.
  • Be prepared if ordering in person. Have your license ready when ordering an abstract in person at a ServiceOntario location.
  • Understand codes and abbreviations. Make sure you understand all the codes and shorthand on your abstract so you know exactly what each violation refers to.
  • Double check your info. Verify that the driver details like name, license number and address are accurate on your abstract.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

Having a clean driving record with no tickets, collisions or infractions can make a big difference when it comes to insurance rates and employability for jobs that require driving. Here are some tips for keeping your Ontario driver’s abstract clean:

 

Drive Safely and Legally

The best way to avoid violations and incidents showing up on your record is to always drive safely and legally. Follow posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, yield properly, and signal all turns and lane changes. Don’t drink and drive or drive while impaired. Making good decisions while behind the wheel can help keep your abstract clean.

 

Check Your Driver Abstract Regularly

Get into the habit of ordering and reviewing your own driver abstract every 6-12 months. This allows you to monitor your record and ensure there are no errors. If a ticket or infraction shows up that you weren’t aware of, you can dispute it immediately while the details are still fresh.

 

Take Defensive Driving Courses

Consider taking an approved defensive driving course, which can make you eligible for a small reduction in insurance premiums. Refreshing your knowledge on safe driving techniques can help avoid collisions and incidents that lead to violations.

 

Wait Out Serious Violations

If you do get cited for a major violation like impaired driving, accept the consequences and wait for the charge to eventually clear from your abstract. Never drive impaired or illegally again. Mistakes can be overcome if you show a commitment to driving safely going forward.

 

Consequences of a Poor Driving Record

Having multiple tickets, collisions, or other violations on your driving record can lead to serious consequences. Your driving abstract provides a summary of your history on the road, which can impact your ability to drive legally as well as your insurance rates and employment prospects.

If you accumulate too many demerit points from offenses like speeding, you may face license suspension or additional penalties. The number of demerit points that lead to a suspension depends on whether you have a full G or M license versus a probationary license.

For fully licensed drivers:

 

  • 15+ points within 2 years = 30 day license suspension
  • 15+ points within 3 years = 60 day suspension
  • 15+ points within 4 years = 90 day suspension
  • 30+ points within 2 years = 60 day suspension
  • 45+ points within 3 years = 90 day suspension

 

For drivers with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 license:

 

  • 5+ points = 30 day suspension
  • 10+ points within 5 years = 90 day suspension

 

If your license is suspended, you will need to pay a $150 reinstatement fee plus a $20 license fee when eligibility is restored. You are not allowed to drive during the suspension period.

Multiple tickets and collisions will also cause your car insurance rates to skyrocket. Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as high-risk and will raise premiums significantly. Some insurers may even decline to renew your policy.

Having a poor driving record can also negatively impact your career prospects and current employment, especially for jobs that involve driving. Employers will often review driver abstracts to assess applicants, and risky driving histories can remove you from consideration for many positions.

The consequences of unsafe driving habits extend well beyond the original ticket or accident. It’s critical to examine your abstract regularly and take steps to improve it over time. Understanding the lasting impacts of violations will help motivate safe driving behaviours too.

 

Disputing Errors on Your Abstract

If you notice any errors on your driving record, such as an incorrect license number, wrong address, tickets you never received, or accidents that were not your fault, you have the right to dispute them. Here is the process for disputing mistakes on your Ontario driving abstract:

 

  1. Gather supporting documents – This may include proof of insurance, police reports, court documents, or any other evidence showing the error. The more documentation you have, the better.
  1. Call ServiceOntario – Explain to the representative that you need to dispute an error on your driving record. They can start a file and investigation into the discrepancy.
  1. Submit dispute form – Print and fill out the “Request/Notification of Change” form on the ServiceOntario website. Attach your supporting documents.
  1. Mail to address – Send the completed dispute form and documents by registered mail to the address listed on the form.
  1. Wait for response – The Ministry should mail you a letter within 4-6 weeks confirming if they updated your driving record or not. Mistakes can take time to fix.
  1. Order new abstract – Once resolved, order a new copy of your driving abstract to verify the change was made.

Following this dispute process correctly gives you the best chance of removing any inaccuracies from your driving record. Pay close attention to response deadlines if the Ministry requests more information from you. Being persistent usually pays off in getting your abstract corrected.

 

Options After License Suspension

Having your license suspended can greatly impact your ability to drive legally and get around. Here are some steps you can take after receiving a license suspension in Ontario:

 

Getting Your License Back After Suspension

If your license was suspended due to unpaid fines or penalties, you’ll need to resolve those first before being able to restore your license. Once any outstanding issues are cleared, you can re-apply for your license through the Ministry of Transportation.

For suspensions related to medical conditions, you’ll need to provide updated medical reports showing you meet the requirements to drive again. This may involve retaking vision, knowledge or road tests.

If your license was suspended due to demerit points, you’ll need to wait out the length of the suspension. For first suspensions, this is usually 3 months. Once the suspension period ends, your license is automatically reinstated.

 

Using an Interlock Device

After certain alcohol-related convictions, you may be able to drive again sooner by having an approved ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle. This breathalyzer unit prevents you from starting your vehicle if alcohol is detected on your breath.

Interlock devices allow you to restore your license and driving privileges while also monitoring your alcohol consumption. You’ll need to pay installation and monthly maintenance fees to use one.

 

Steps to Restore Your License

The general steps to get your license back after a suspension include:

 

  • Resolving any outstanding fines, penalties or medical/vision issues
  • Completing remedial programs if required, like drinking driver programs
  • Applying for license reinstatement and paying the fee
  • Passing any required knowledge or road tests
  • Using an interlock device if applicable
  • Maintaining a clean record during your suspension period

 

It’s important to follow all the proper steps when trying to restore your driving privileges after a suspension. This shows you’ve learned from your mistakes and are ready to comply with all road safety laws going forward.

 

Comparing Ontario to Other Provinces

There are some key differences between getting your driving record in Ontario versus other Canadian provinces. Here’s what you need to know if you’re moving from or planning to drive in other parts of the country:

In British Columbia, you can request your 3-year driver’s abstract online from ICBC for $15. An abstract with your full history costs $30. Your record includes any penalties, prohibitions, collisions and convictions.

In Alberta, you can get your uncertified 3-year record online instantly for $11.95. A 5-year certified abstract is $17.95. Your Alberta record shows suspensions, disqualifications, convictions and collisions.

Quebec provides access to your driver’s abstract online, which includes any demerit points, suspensions or criminal code convictions from the past 10 years. There is no charge to view your abstract.

The Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI) handle abstracts differently, charging fees in person at Access Nova Scotia centers instead of online. Newfoundland and Labrador provides digital records free of charge.

The key takeaway is that each province has its own system, timeline and fees for obtaining records. While there are differences, the essential information on tickets, accidents and suspensions is standardized across Canada.

 

Conclusion

In summary, an Ontario driver’s abstract is an important record that provides details about your driving history. Checking your abstract regularly allows you to monitor your record, dispute any errors, and maintain a clean driving history.

Key points to remember include:

 

  • Driver abstracts can be obtained online, by mail, or in-person via ServiceOntario
  • Abstracts contain licence info, violations, convictions, suspensions, and collisions
  • Violations stay on your record for 3 years from conviction date
  • Multiple major violations can lead to escalating sanctions
  • Always check your abstract after collisions or violations
  • Dispute any errors on your record promptly

 

By frequently reviewing your driving record, driving safely and obeying all rules of the road, you can keep your abstract clean and avoid consequences like increased insurance costs. Remember to always check your abstract after collisions, violations or licence upgrades to ensure it remains accurate.

Ontario Driver's Abstract Questions

An Ontario driver’s abstract is an official record of your driving history issued by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). It lists details like your license information, any collisions you’ve been involved in, driving convictions like tickets and suspensions, and your current number of demerit points. Insurance companies and some employers often request abstracts to verify your driving record.

You can easily order your uncertified 3-year Ontario driver’s abstract online from the MTO website. The fee is $12. For a certified abstract with an official seal, you must mail in a request or visit a ServiceOntario location in person. Certified abstracts cost $18 and take 6-8 weeks to receive by mail.

Your Ontario driver’s abstract will include your license details like class, status, and expiry date. It also lists any collisions, convictions, fines or suspensions over the past 3 years, including dates and locations. The number of demerit points accumulated and remaining on your license will also be shown.

Most entries remain on your Ontario driving record for at least 3 years from the date of conviction. Certain Criminal Code convictions stay on your record for 10 years. Failures to appear in court and some suspensions can show for 6 years. Once the retention period ends, items are automatically removed from your abstract.

To access your full 5-year driving history in Ontario, you need to request a uncertified driver record search from the Ministry of Transportation. The extended abstract costs $20 and takes 6-8 weeks to receive by mail. 5-year abstracts are used for employment driving positions.

Unfortunately, Ontario does not currently offer an online service for drivers to instantly view their own abstracts. Only authorized organizations can access and request driving records electronically. As a regular driver, you need to order an official abstract by mail or in person. Some private companies offer fast online abstracts.

Ordering your basic 3-year uncertified Ontario driver’s abstract online costs $12. The fee for a mailed certified abstract with a seal is $18. For commercial drivers, uncertified CVOR abstracts are $5 and certified CVOR abstracts are $10. Extended 5-year uncertified abstracts cost $20.

The most common reasons for requesting your driving record are for insurance purposes, pre-employment screening for driving positions, and after you’ve applied for financing a new vehicle. Prospective landlords may also ask for an abstract to assess tenant applications.

No, an out-of-province driving abstract is not accepted for licensing purposes if moving to Ontario. You’ll need to exchange your valid driver’s license from another province for an Ontario driver’s license within 60 days. Your previous driving record will be transferred during this process.

An Ontario driver’s record refers to your complete history stored in the MTO database. An abstract is an official document summarizing details from your record over a set period, usually 3 years. Abstracts are used to share driving information with third parties like insurance companies.

If you order an uncertified abstract online, it’s delivered to your email instantly. Certified abstracts ordered by mail take about 6-8 weeks to receive. For 5-year abstracts and driver record searches, expect mailing delays of up to 2 months before getting your official driving history report.

Yes, uncertified 3-year and 5-year driver abstracts can be ordered online and delivered straight to your email, usually in a matter of seconds. However, only physical certified abstracts with a seal are available by mail in Ontario. No digital or electronic versions exist for certified abstracts.

Standard uncertified abstracts show your driving record for the previous 3 years. For a longer history, 5-year uncertified abstracts are available capturing entries over the past 5 years. Certain convictions can stay on your Ontario record for 6-10 years, but won’t show on abstracts after the 3 or 5 year reporting periods.

Only authorized people and organizations can legally access your driving information. This includes police, courts, insurance companies with consent, doctors for medical reporting, and government bodies like the MTO. Prospective employers can also access driving records for commercial driving positions with consent.

No. Due to privacy laws, only the licence holder themselves can request access to their own driving record in Ontario. Insurance companies can only retrieve your abstract with direct, documented consent. Exceptions may occur during legal proceedings with a warrant or subpoena.

Ontario drivers start with zero demerit points. As you accumulate convictions, you get demerit points added to your license based on the offence. For example, speeding adds 3 points. Once you reach 15 points in a 2-year period, your license will be automatically suspended.

Demerit points remain active on your Ontario driving record for 2 years from the date of conviction. After the 2 year period, the associated demerit points expire and are removed from your license. However, the convictions themselves stay on your abstract for at least 3 years.

The Driver’s Licence History Search is an online service that displays basic status details about an Ontario driver’s license, rather than a full record. It shows license class, expiry date, beginner driver education status, and administrative changes like reinstatements. It does not give driving history details.

Yes, you can share your uncertified abstract with third parties like potential employers and landlords. However, it’s illegal for them to share your private driving information further without documented consent. Certified abstracts with a seal are more official and also accepted by insurance providers.

Industry experts typically recommend checking your own Ontario driving abstract at least once a year. This allows you to review your record for accuracy, ensure any expired convictions have been removed, and check details if shopping for auto insurance renewals or applying for driving jobs.

 

What is an Ontario Driver’s Abstract?

An Ontario driver’s abstract, also known as a driver’s record, driving record, or driver’s licence record, is an official document that lists a licensed driver’s history. It provides details on driving offences, collisions, and license suspensions over a set period of time.

There are a few different types of abstracts available in Ontario:

 

  • 3 Year Uncertified Abstract – This contains all driving convictions, suspensions, and collisions registered over the last 3 years. It is used for personal and employment purposes.
  • 3 Year Certified Abstract – Same as above but certified with an official seal to confirm its authenticity. Often used for legal proceedings.
  • 5 Year Uncertified Abstract – Provides 5 years of records instead of 3.
  • Driver Record Search – Confirms license validity and status. Includes driver education completion.
  • Driver Licence History Search – Validates license authenticity. Shows license number, class, status, expiry date and more.

 

The government uses abstracts to monitor drivers and identify those with poor records. Drivers can also request their own abstracts to review their history and check for errors.

 

Why Check Your Driving Record?

There are several important reasons why drivers in Ontario should periodically check their driving record:

Insurance Purposes

Car insurance companies will look at your driving abstract when determining your premiums. Too many tickets, at-fault accidents, or other violations can result in much higher insurance rates. Reviewing your abstract lets you know what violations insurance companies will see when assessing your risk.

Employment Purposes

Many employers, especially for driving positions, will ask for a copy of your abstract. This allows them to verify any licence suspensions, DWIs, reckless driving charges, or other serious offenses. A poor driving history could disqualify you for certain jobs.

Monitor and Improve Your Record

Checking your own record lets you monitor any active demerit points, convictions, or suspensions. This knowledge allows you time to improve your driving skills, take driving courses, or simply drive safer before facing penalties. Monitoring your record helps hold you accountable.

Avoid Surprises

By reviewing your own record, you avoid any unpleasant surprises if pulled over or at renewal time. You can proactively take steps to improve your driving and correct any issues.

In summary, regularly checking your own driving abstract is crucial for keeping insurance costs low, maintaining employability, improving driving habits, and avoiding penalties or suspensions.

 

How to Get Your Ontario Driver Abstract

There are a few different ways you can obtain a copy of your Ontario driver’s abstract:

 

Order Online

The fastest and most convenient way is to order your abstract online through the Ontario Ministry of Transportation’s website. You can purchase either a 3-year uncertified abstract for $12 or a 3-year certified abstract for $18. The certified abstract will have an official seal while the uncertified does not.

To order online, go to the Ministry of Transportation website and complete the online order form. You will need your driver’s licence number, date of birth, and payment information. Online orders are usually processed within 1 business day.

 

Order by Mail

You can also order an abstract by mailing in a request form along with payment. Download the Driver Record Request form and mail it with a cheque or money order to the address listed on the form.

Mailed requests take about 15 business days to be processed once received by the Ministry.

 

In-Person

Finally, you can visit a ServiceOntario location and order an abstract in-person. You will need to provide valid ID. The fee is the same as ordering online.

You will receive your abstract right away if ordering in-person. This is the fastest option if you need your abstract immediately.

 

What’s Included in an Ontario Driver Abstract

An Ontario driver’s abstract contains important details about your driving record over the past several years. Here are some of the key items included on your abstract:

 

  • Driver information like your name, license number, address, and date of birth
  • The license classes you hold (e.g. G, G1, G2, M, M1, M2)
  • License status and original issue date
  • Expiry date of your license
  • Details of any collisions you’ve been involved in
  • Convictions and fines for traffic violations like speeding, careless driving, failure to stop, etc.
  • Failing a roadside sobriety test
  • License suspensions, both current and previous
  • Medical suspensions
  • Accumulated demerit points and current total
  • Whether you’ve completed a remedial drivers education course

 

Having all this information in one place provides a comprehensive snapshot of your history as a driver in Ontario over the past several years. Checking your abstract regularly is important to ensure the information is up-to-date and accurate.

 

How Long Violations Stay on Your Record

The length of time a violation remains on your Ontario driving record depends on the severity of the incident. Here’s an overview of how long some common violations typically stay on your abstract:

 

Major Convictions

Major convictions like impaired driving, failing to stop after an accident, and street racing remain on your driver’s record for 10 years from the date of conviction.

 

Serious Convictions

Violations like careless driving and excessive speeding over 50 km/hr over the limit stay on your abstract for 6 years.

 

Minor Convictions

Minor traffic violations like speeding under 50 km/hr over the limit, improper turns, and disobeying traffic signals stay on your record for 3 years.

 

Demerit Points

Demerit points remain on your driving record for 2 years from the conviction date. Accumulating too many points can lead to increased insurance rates or license suspension.

It’s important to note that even after a conviction drops off your abstract, it may still be considered by insurance companies when calculating your premiums.

 

Tips for Checking Your Abstract

When it comes to ordering and reviewing your driving abstract, here are some tips to keep in mind:

 

  • Order online for fastest delivery. You can get an uncertified abstract emailed to you right away by using a third party service. Going through the MTO can take 15 business days.
  • Review annually. Check your abstract at least once a year to ensure there are no errors or surprises.
  • Make corrections promptly. If there is an error on your abstract, contact the MTO right away to have it corrected.
  • Note violations about to drop off. Violations stay on your record for 3 years, so keep an eye on when they will disappear.
  • Check different record types. Your driver’s license history, CVOR abstract, and driver record all provide useful information from different perspectives.
  • Save copies. Whenever you order a new abstract, save a copy for your records in case you need to dispute something in the future.
  • Be prepared if ordering in person. Have your license ready when ordering an abstract in person at a ServiceOntario location.
  • Understand codes and abbreviations. Make sure you understand all the codes and shorthand on your abstract so you know exactly what each violation refers to.
  • Double check your info. Verify that the driver details like name, license number and address are accurate on your abstract.

 

Maintaining a Clean Driving Record

Having a clean driving record with no tickets, collisions or infractions can make a big difference when it comes to insurance rates and employability for jobs that require driving. Here are some tips for keeping your Ontario driver’s abstract clean:

 

Drive Safely and Legally

The best way to avoid violations and incidents showing up on your record is to always drive safely and legally. Follow posted speed limits, come to complete stops at stop signs, yield properly, and signal all turns and lane changes. Don’t drink and drive or drive while impaired. Making good decisions while behind the wheel can help keep your abstract clean.

 

Check Your Driver Abstract Regularly

Get into the habit of ordering and reviewing your own driver abstract every 6-12 months. This allows you to monitor your record and ensure there are no errors. If a ticket or infraction shows up that you weren’t aware of, you can dispute it immediately while the details are still fresh.

 

Take Defensive Driving Courses

Consider taking an approved defensive driving course, which can make you eligible for a small reduction in insurance premiums. Refreshing your knowledge on safe driving techniques can help avoid collisions and incidents that lead to violations.

 

Wait Out Serious Violations

If you do get cited for a major violation like impaired driving, accept the consequences and wait for the charge to eventually clear from your abstract. Never drive impaired or illegally again. Mistakes can be overcome if you show a commitment to driving safely going forward.

 

Consequences of a Poor Driving Record

Having multiple tickets, collisions, or other violations on your driving record can lead to serious consequences. Your driving abstract provides a summary of your history on the road, which can impact your ability to drive legally as well as your insurance rates and employment prospects.

If you accumulate too many demerit points from offenses like speeding, you may face license suspension or additional penalties. The number of demerit points that lead to a suspension depends on whether you have a full G or M license versus a probationary license.

For fully licensed drivers:

 

  • 15+ points within 2 years = 30 day license suspension
  • 15+ points within 3 years = 60 day suspension
  • 15+ points within 4 years = 90 day suspension
  • 30+ points within 2 years = 60 day suspension
  • 45+ points within 3 years = 90 day suspension

 

For drivers with a G1, G2, M1, or M2 license:

 

  • 5+ points = 30 day suspension
  • 10+ points within 5 years = 90 day suspension

 

If your license is suspended, you will need to pay a $150 reinstatement fee plus a $20 license fee when eligibility is restored. You are not allowed to drive during the suspension period.

Multiple tickets and collisions will also cause your car insurance rates to skyrocket. Insurance companies view drivers with multiple violations as high-risk and will raise premiums significantly. Some insurers may even decline to renew your policy.

Having a poor driving record can also negatively impact your career prospects and current employment, especially for jobs that involve driving. Employers will often review driver abstracts to assess applicants, and risky driving histories can remove you from consideration for many positions.

The consequences of unsafe driving habits extend well beyond the original ticket or accident. It’s critical to examine your abstract regularly and take steps to improve it over time. Understanding the lasting impacts of violations will help motivate safe driving behaviours too.

 

Disputing Errors on Your Abstract

If you notice any errors on your driving record, such as an incorrect license number, wrong address, tickets you never received, or accidents that were not your fault, you have the right to dispute them. Here is the process for disputing mistakes on your Ontario driving abstract:

 

  1. Gather supporting documents – This may include proof of insurance, police reports, court documents, or any other evidence showing the error. The more documentation you have, the better.
  1. Call ServiceOntario – Explain to the representative that you need to dispute an error on your driving record. They can start a file and investigation into the discrepancy.
  1. Submit dispute form – Print and fill out the “Request/Notification of Change” form on the ServiceOntario website. Attach your supporting documents.
  1. Mail to address – Send the completed dispute form and documents by registered mail to the address listed on the form.
  1. Wait for response – The Ministry should mail you a letter within 4-6 weeks confirming if they updated your driving record or not. Mistakes can take time to fix.
  1. Order new abstract – Once resolved, order a new copy of your driving abstract to verify the change was made.

Following this dispute process correctly gives you the best chance of removing any inaccuracies from your driving record. Pay close attention to response deadlines if the Ministry requests more information from you. Being persistent usually pays off in getting your abstract corrected.

 

Options After License Suspension

Having your license suspended can greatly impact your ability to drive legally and get around. Here are some steps you can take after receiving a license suspension in Ontario:

 

Getting Your License Back After Suspension

If your license was suspended due to unpaid fines or penalties, you’ll need to resolve those first before being able to restore your license. Once any outstanding issues are cleared, you can re-apply for your license through the Ministry of Transportation.

For suspensions related to medical conditions, you’ll need to provide updated medical reports showing you meet the requirements to drive again. This may involve retaking vision, knowledge or road tests.

If your license was suspended due to demerit points, you’ll need to wait out the length of the suspension. For first suspensions, this is usually 3 months. Once the suspension period ends, your license is automatically reinstated.

 

Using an Interlock Device

After certain alcohol-related convictions, you may be able to drive again sooner by having an approved ignition interlock device installed in your vehicle. This breathalyzer unit prevents you from starting your vehicle if alcohol is detected on your breath.

Interlock devices allow you to restore your license and driving privileges while also monitoring your alcohol consumption. You’ll need to pay installation and monthly maintenance fees to use one.

 

Steps to Restore Your License

The general steps to get your license back after a suspension include:

 

  • Resolving any outstanding fines, penalties or medical/vision issues
  • Completing remedial programs if required, like drinking driver programs
  • Applying for license reinstatement and paying the fee
  • Passing any required knowledge or road tests
  • Using an interlock device if applicable
  • Maintaining a clean record during your suspension period

 

It’s important to follow all the proper steps when trying to restore your driving privileges after a suspension. This shows you’ve learned from your mistakes and are ready to comply with all road safety laws going forward.

 

Comparing Ontario to Other Provinces

There are some key differences between getting your driving record in Ontario versus other Canadian provinces. Here’s what you need to know if you’re moving from or planning to drive in other parts of the country:

In British Columbia, you can request your 3-year driver’s abstract online from ICBC for $15. An abstract with your full history costs $30. Your record includes any penalties, prohibitions, collisions and convictions.

In Alberta, you can get your uncertified 3-year record online instantly for $11.95. A 5-year certified abstract is $17.95. Your Alberta record shows suspensions, disqualifications, convictions and collisions.

Quebec provides access to your driver’s abstract online, which includes any demerit points, suspensions or criminal code convictions from the past 10 years. There is no charge to view your abstract.

The Maritimes (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, PEI) handle abstracts differently, charging fees in person at Access Nova Scotia centers instead of online. Newfoundland and Labrador provides digital records free of charge.

The key takeaway is that each province has its own system, timeline and fees for obtaining records. While there are differences, the essential information on tickets, accidents and suspensions is standardized across Canada.

 

Conclusion

In summary, an Ontario driver’s abstract is an important record that provides details about your driving history. Checking your abstract regularly allows you to monitor your record, dispute any errors, and maintain a clean driving history.

Key points to remember include:

 

  • Driver abstracts can be obtained online, by mail, or in-person via ServiceOntario
  • Abstracts contain licence info, violations, convictions, suspensions, and collisions
  • Violations stay on your record for 3 years from conviction date
  • Multiple major violations can lead to escalating sanctions
  • Always check your abstract after collisions or violations
  • Dispute any errors on your record promptly

 

By frequently reviewing your driving record, driving safely and obeying all rules of the road, you can keep your abstract clean and avoid consequences like increased insurance costs. Remember to always check your abstract after collisions, violations or licence upgrades to ensure it remains accurate.

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Ontario Driver's Abstract Questions

An Ontario driver’s abstract is an official record of your driving history issued by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). It lists details like your license information, any collisions you’ve been involved in, driving convictions like tickets and suspensions, and your current number of demerit points. Insurance companies and some employers often request abstracts to verify your driving record.

You can easily order your uncertified 3-year Ontario driver’s abstract online from the MTO website. The fee is $12. For a certified abstract with an official seal, you must mail in a request or visit a ServiceOntario location in person. Certified abstracts cost $18 and take 6-8 weeks to receive by mail.

Your Ontario driver’s abstract will include your license details like class, status, and expiry date. It also lists any collisions, convictions, fines or suspensions over the past 3 years, including dates and locations. The number of demerit points accumulated and remaining on your license will also be shown.

Most entries remain on your Ontario driving record for at least 3 years from the date of conviction. Certain Criminal Code convictions stay on your record for 10 years. Failures to appear in court and some suspensions can show for 6 years. Once the retention period ends, items are automatically removed from your abstract.

To access your full 5-year driving history in Ontario, you need to request a uncertified driver record search from the Ministry of Transportation. The extended abstract costs $20 and takes 6-8 weeks to receive by mail. 5-year abstracts are used for employment driving positions.

Unfortunately, Ontario does not currently offer an online service for drivers to instantly view their own abstracts. Only authorized organizations can access and request driving records electronically. As a regular driver, you need to order an official abstract by mail or in person. Some private companies offer fast online abstracts.

Ordering your basic 3-year uncertified Ontario driver’s abstract online costs $12. The fee for a mailed certified abstract with a seal is $18. For commercial drivers, uncertified CVOR abstracts are $5 and certified CVOR abstracts are $10. Extended 5-year uncertified abstracts cost $20.

The most common reasons for requesting your driving record are for insurance purposes, pre-employment screening for driving positions, and after you’ve applied for financing a new vehicle. Prospective landlords may also ask for an abstract to assess tenant applications.

No, an out-of-province driving abstract is not accepted for licensing purposes if moving to Ontario. You’ll need to exchange your valid driver’s license from another province for an Ontario driver’s license within 60 days. Your previous driving record will be transferred during this process.

An Ontario driver’s record refers to your complete history stored in the MTO database. An abstract is an official document summarizing details from your record over a set period, usually 3 years. Abstracts are used to share driving information with third parties like insurance companies.

If you order an uncertified abstract online, it’s delivered to your email instantly. Certified abstracts ordered by mail take about 6-8 weeks to receive. For 5-year abstracts and driver record searches, expect mailing delays of up to 2 months before getting your official driving history report.

Yes, uncertified 3-year and 5-year driver abstracts can be ordered online and delivered straight to your email, usually in a matter of seconds. However, only physical certified abstracts with a seal are available by mail in Ontario. No digital or electronic versions exist for certified abstracts.

Standard uncertified abstracts show your driving record for the previous 3 years. For a longer history, 5-year uncertified abstracts are available capturing entries over the past 5 years. Certain convictions can stay on your Ontario record for 6-10 years, but won’t show on abstracts after the 3 or 5 year reporting periods.

Only authorized people and organizations can legally access your driving information. This includes police, courts, insurance companies with consent, doctors for medical reporting, and government bodies like the MTO. Prospective employers can also access driving records for commercial driving positions with consent.

No. Due to privacy laws, only the licence holder themselves can request access to their own driving record in Ontario. Insurance companies can only retrieve your abstract with direct, documented consent. Exceptions may occur during legal proceedings with a warrant or subpoena.

Ontario drivers start with zero demerit points. As you accumulate convictions, you get demerit points added to your license based on the offence. For example, speeding adds 3 points. Once you reach 15 points in a 2-year period, your license will be automatically suspended.

Demerit points remain active on your Ontario driving record for 2 years from the date of conviction. After the 2 year period, the associated demerit points expire and are removed from your license. However, the convictions themselves stay on your abstract for at least 3 years.

The Driver’s Licence History Search is an online service that displays basic status details about an Ontario driver’s license, rather than a full record. It shows license class, expiry date, beginner driver education status, and administrative changes like reinstatements. It does not give driving history details.

Yes, you can share your uncertified abstract with third parties like potential employers and landlords. However, it’s illegal for them to share your private driving information further without documented consent. Certified abstracts with a seal are more official and also accepted by insurance providers.

Industry experts typically recommend checking your own Ontario driving abstract at least once a year. This allows you to review your record for accuracy, ensure any expired convictions have been removed, and check details if shopping for auto insurance renewals or applying for driving jobs.

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