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Saskatchewan Driver's Abstract

Saskatchewan

A driver’s abstract is an important record outlining your history as a driver in a specific province or territory. In Saskatchewan, all driving convictions, collisions, suspensions, and other incidents are compiled into a comprehensive report that serves as your official driving record.

Having a clean, up-to-date Saskatchewan driver’s abstract is crucial for several reasons. It provides critical information to insurance providers when determining your auto insurance rates. It also gives prospective employers insights into your driving history and qualifications if you’re applying for a position that involves operating vehicles or equipment. Furthermore, keeping tabs on your own abstract ensures your record is accurate and allows you to dispute any errors.

This guide will cover everything Saskatchewan residents need to know about obtaining, understanding, and disputing items on their provincial driver’s abstract. Topics include:

 

  • What’s included in a SK drivers abstract
  • How to get your Saskatchewan drivers abstract
  • Drivers abstract cost
  • How to understand your abstract
  • How to dispute incorrect information
  • And more…

 

Let’s get started demystifying this important document for Saskatchewan motorists.

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What is a Drivers Abstract in Saskatchewan?

A driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan is an official record provided by Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI). It summarizes your full history as a driver in the province.

The Saskatchewan drivers abstract contains key details about your driving record, including:

 

  • Driver’s license number
  • Date of birth
  • Class of license
  • Issue date
  • Expiry date
  • Endorsements
  • Restrictions
  • Demerit points
  • Convictions
  • Collisions
  • Driver improvement actions
  • Driver license status

 

Having this comprehensive snapshot of your driving history in one document can be useful for many reasons, which we’ll explore throughout this guide.

 

Why You Need a Drivers Abstract

There are several important reasons why you may need to obtain a copy of your Saskatchewan drivers abstract. Some of the most common reasons include:

 

Insurance Purposes

Insurance companies will often request your drivers abstract when issuing new policies or renewing existing ones. They use the information to accurately assess risk factors and determine your premiums based on your driving history and any past convictions.

 

Employment

Many employers, especially those who require employees to drive as part of their job, will ask for a current drivers abstract. This allows them to verify your license status and ensure you have a clean driving record before entrusting you with a company vehicle.

 

Border Crossings

A valid Saskatchewan drivers abstract may be required when crossing the US border. Border agents can request it to confirm you have a valid license and are authorized to drive in Canada.

 

Review Your Driving Record

Obtaining your own copy of your drivers abstract allows you to review your full driving history. You can check it for errors, see any traffic violations or collisions, ensure proper credit for clean years, and monitor for high-risk status.

 

What’s Included in a SK Drivers Abstract

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract includes important details about your driving history and license status. Here’s what you can expect to find on your abstract:

License Information

Your abstract will list personal details like your full name, date of birth, license number, issue date, and expiration date. It also shows the class of license you hold and any endorsements.

Violations

Any traffic violations like speeding tickets, failure to stop, seatbelt infractions, and other offenses will be listed. The abstract shows the date, location, and nature of each violation.

Collisions

The abstract records any collisions you’ve been involved in. At-fault collisions are clearly indicated. Details like date, location, and a brief incident description are included.

Suspensions

Suspensions and disqualifications due to too many demerits, medical reasons, DUIs, or other causes appear on your abstract. It notes the suspension start and end dates.

Medical Information

Certain medical conditions must be reported to the licensing authorities. Any medical restrictions related to your license are documented in this section.

 

How Far Back Does it Go?

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain information for the past 5 years, with some exceptions. For most traffic offences and collisions, the abstract will show a 3 year history. However, Criminal Code violations and suspensions related to alcohol or drug impaired driving will remain on your SK abstract for 5 years.

Here is what will show for 5 years on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract:

 

  • Impaired driving suspensions
  • Driving while disqualified suspensions
  • Criminal Code driving convictions like dangerous driving
  • Failing or refusing to provide a breath or blood sample
  • Driving while suspended under the Alcohol and Gaming Regulation Act

 

All other driving offences, at-fault claims, and collisions will remain on your SK abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. This includes things like speeding tickets, stop sign violations, improper turns, following too close, distracted driving, etc.

Knowing what stays on your driving record is important, especially if you’ll be using your Saskatchewan drivers abstract for employment purposes where a clean record is required. Certain Criminal Code violations can continue to impact your abstract eligibility long after the incident occurred.

 

How to Get Your Saskatchewan Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to obtain your drivers abstract in Saskatchewan:

 

Online

The quickest and easiest way is to request your abstract online through SGI. You can login to your MySGI account and view your abstract immediately. To order a print copy, there is a small fee. Make sure you have a MySGI account set up ahead of time.

 

In-Person

Visit any SGI issuer office in-person and request a copy of your abstract. You will need to provide sufficient ID and pay the $15 fee. This method allows you to walk out with your abstract printed on the spot.

 

By Mail/Fax

You can request an abstract by mailing or faxing a completed Driver Abstract Request Form to SGI. Be sure to include payment information. Processing can take up to 5 business days. You will receive the abstract by mail. The mailing address and fax number are on the form.

No matter which method you choose, you will need your 9-digit Saskatchewan drivers license number ready to verify your identity.

 

Drivers Abstract Cost

One of the most common questions about obtaining your Saskatchewan drivers abstract relates to cost. How much does it cost to get your driving record from SGI?

The current fee for a personal Saskatchewan drivers abstract is $15. This pricing applies whether you request your abstract online, in-person at an SGI location, or by mail. The $15 covers the lookup and documentation fees associated with generating your official driving record.

Commercial drivers abstracts also cost $15 through SGI. So if you need your full commercial and personal driving history, it will be $15 for each report.

There are no discounts or exemptions from the $15 fee per abstract. All Saskatchewan drivers must pay this amount to access their records. The only exception is if you require your abstract for certain legal reasons – in those cases SGI may waive the fee.

So in summary, expect to pay $15 for each personal or commercial Saskatchewan drivers abstract you request from SGI. This standard $15 pricing makes it affordable for all drivers to access their records.

 

How Long is it Valid?

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is only valid for 30 days from the issue date. After 30 days, the abstract is considered expired and can no longer be used as an official record of your driving history. This is an important detail to note if you’re using your abstract for employment, insurance, car loan or legal purposes.

The 30-day validity period exists to ensure the abstract contains the most up-to-date information. Within that 30 days, any new charges, convictions or other changes will be added to your driving record and reflected on subsequent abstracts. Relying on an expired abstract could provide inaccurate or incomplete details about your history behind the wheel.

So if you order a copy of your SK drivers abstract, be sure to use it right away for its intended purpose. And don’t try to pass off an outdated abstract after 30 days have passed. Only a current abstract within the validity period will be accepted as valid proof of your driving record.

 

Understanding Your Drivers Abstract

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain several sections with important details about your driving history. Reviewing a sample abstract can help you understand exactly what’s included.

The top of the document will have your full legal name, date of birth, driver’s license number, and the issue date for the abstract. This section verifies your identity.

The Convictions section lists any traffic violations you’ve been convicted of within the time period covered by the abstract. This includes offenses like speeding, failure to stop, and distracted driving. Each conviction shows the date, a short description, and the number of demerit points associated with it.

The Administrative Sanctions section covers penalties imposed by SGI against your license, such as suspensions. It provides the start and end dates for each sanction along with a brief explanation like “3 Day ALS Fail.”

Any collisions where you were deemed fully or partially responsible are listed in the At-Fault Claims section. This provides the date and a summary of each incident. Fatalities or injuries from at-fault collisions may also be noted.

The Abstract Totals segment at the end tallies up key figures like the total number of convictions, the lifetime demerit points, and whether your license status is clear or suspended.

Knowing how to interpret each component can help you verify your abstract is accurate and understand how your driving record is being evaluated.

 

Disputing Information on Your Abstract

If you find any errors or inaccuracies on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract, you can dispute this information by contacting SGI directly.

The first step is to carefully review your abstract to identify any incorrect violations, convictions, suspensions or other driving history details that have been recorded. Make note of any errors you find.

Next, contact SGI’s Driver Records department by phone or mail. Be prepared to provide your name, license number, date of birth and details on the errors you wish to dispute. SGI may request supporting documentation such as court records to correct serious offenses.

For minor inaccuracies, SGI will investigate based on the details you provide. If the error is validated, SGI will update your driving record. This corrected abstract can then be used for insurance, employment or any other purposes requiring your driving history.

It’s important to dispute mistakes on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract in a timely manner. Driving records are used to make decisions about insurance rates, licensing and employability for commercial drivers. Inaccurate violations or offenses could lead to unjust penalties or premium increases.

By contacting SGI to correct errors on your abstract, you can ensure it accurately reflects your true driving history in Saskatchewan.

 

Improving Your Driving Record

If you’ve ended up with a less-than-stellar driving record, there are steps you can take to improve it. Having violations and collisions on your record can impact your insurance rates and even your ability to drive commercially or keep your license. Focus on driving defensively and minimizing further incidents.

Consider taking a defensive driving course. These courses teach anticipatory driving and how to avoid collisions. Many insurance companies will offer a discount on your premiums for completing an approved defensive driving course. This can help offset the increase caused by violations on your record.

Be mindful of road conditions, distractions, impairment, aggression, and drowsy driving. Drive for the conditions, put your phone away, and make sure you’re alert and focused. Follow the rules of the road and speed limits. Don’t drive if impaired by alcohol, drugs, or lack of sleep.

Check the point system in Saskatchewan to understand how different violations impact your license. Work on eliminating behaviours that lead to violations and collisions. Minor offenses like speeding or running a red light add up over time. Major offenses can cause immediate suspension. Drive carefully to keep your record clean.

Wait for violations to roll off your abstract after 3 years. Over time, as you avoid further incidents, your record will start to improve. Old tickets and collisions drop off your abstract after 36 months. Maintain a clean record long enough and your insurance rates will decrease.

 

High-Risk Driver Designation

In Saskatchewan, drivers who accumulate an excessive number of traffic violations, at-fault collisions, or specific convictions may be designated as “high-risk drivers” by SGI. This designation is part of SGI’s Driver Improvement Program aimed at improving road safety.

The criteria for being designated a high-risk driver include:

 

  • Accumulating 15 or more demerit points within 2 years
  • Being convicted of excessive speeding (50 km/h or more over the speed limit)
  • Being convicted of criminal negligence causing death or bodily harm
  • Having a poor collision record, including multiple at-fault collisions within a short time period

 

Once designated as a high-risk driver, there are several consequences including:

 

  • Having to pay a High Risk Driver premium on your auto insurance
  • Having your drivers license suspended for up to 6 months
  • Being required to take the SGI Driver Improvement Program course

 

The Driver Improvement Program involves taking a full-day in-class education session combined with an in-car coaching session. It is designed to identify and address poor driving habits and attitudes. Completing the program is mandatory for high-risk designated drivers who want to regain their full driving privileges.

 

Commercial Drivers Abstracts

Commercial drivers in Saskatchewan require a special commercial drivers abstract in addition to their regular drivers abstract. This is required for anyone applying for or renewing Class 1-4 driver’s licenses.

Commercial drivers abstracts contain additional information required for assessing commercial driving privileges, including:

 

  • Current Driver Status
  • Commercial Driver’s License Information
  • NSC Safety Rating
  • ME/CV Medical Expiry Date
  • Current Demerit Points
  • Convictions & Collisions
  • Commercial Vehicle Inspections
  • Sanctions

 

Commercial drivers abstracts can be obtained by request from the SGI, usually within 1-3 business days. There is a $15 fee.

It’s important for commercial drivers to stay on top of their driving records, as any convictions, at-fault collisions, or violations can negatively impact their ability to maintain necessary commercial driving privileges. Regularly reviewing your commercial abstract helps identify any issues early.

 

Using Your Saskatchewan Abstract

Your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract serves many important purposes beyond just reviewing your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways your SK abstract may be used:

 

Insurance

Auto insurance providers will often request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract when determining your premiums. A clean driving record with no accidents, tickets or suspensions will generally qualify you for the lowest insurance rates. Minor incidents may lead to slightly higher premiums, while multiple, more serious violations can cause steep rate increases.

It’s in your best interest to periodically review your own abstract and dispute any incorrect information, so you aren’t paying higher premiums due to errors on your record. Maintaining a clean abstract by driving safely and responsibly will save you money on insurance costs over the long run.

 

Employment

Certain employers, especially those requiring driving for work, will ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract during the hiring process and throughout your employment. Positions like truck drivers, couriers, delivery drivers, chauffeurs and commercial vehicle operators usually require a clean abstract.

For liability reasons, employers need to confirm you have a valid license and safe driving history before allowing you to drive for work purposes. A poor abstract with multiple violations may disqualify you from being hired or lead to dismissal if you are already employed.

 

Crossing the Border

When crossing into the United States at land ports of entry, border officials may ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract along with your passport and other ID. This helps verify you have a valid license and clean driving record.

Entering the U.S. with a suspended license or multiple violations on your abstract can lead to denied entry or other problems at the border. Keeping your abstract up to date and in good standing makes border crossings quick and easy.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is an important record of your driving history in the province. It provides a comprehensive overview of any collisions, violations, suspensions or serious offenses associated with your driver’s license.

While the information on your abstract is essential for insurance providers and employers to evaluate your driving risk, don’t let a few minor blemishes give you cause for concern. Most drivers will have an incident or two appear on their record over the years.

The key is to routinely review your abstract and understand how past driving behavior may impact your insurance rates, ability to rent vehicles, or opportunities for employment requiring driving. If any information appears incorrect, pursue options to dispute or correct it right away.

Above all, drive safely and responsibly going forward. This will limit new entries on your abstract while also demonstrating to insurers that you’ve improved as a driver. While your history remains relevant, companies will pay the most attention to your current driving record.

Maintaining a clean, violation-free abstract for a number of years is the best approach for minimizing insurance premiums and securing jobs dependent on your driving record. Mature and reformed driving habits will advocate for you better than any other credential on your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan Driver's Abstract​ Questions

To get your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan, you need to submit a request to SGI (Saskatchewan Government Insurance). You can request your abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, by fax, mail, or in person at an SGI issuer. The fee is $15 per abstract. Your abstract will provide a 3-year record of any convictions, collisions, suspensions, revocations, and driving prohibitions.

A Saskatchewan driver’s abstract includes your:

 

– Name

– Date of birth

– Driver’s licence number

– Driver’s licence class

– Issue and expiry dates

– Medical conditions that require you to have an adjusted licence

– Convictions and suspensions for the past 3 years

– Collisions you’ve been involved in for the past 3 years

– Demerit points total

Saskatchewan driver abstracts provide a 3-year record of your driving history. This includes any collisions, convictions, suspensions, revocations or driving prohibitions in the last 3 years.

 

If you have been licensed in Saskatchewan for less than 3 years, your abstract will only go back to when you first became a Saskatchewan resident or received your Saskatchewan driver’s licence.

No, you cannot access someone else’s driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan unless you have written consent from that person. Third-party consent forms are available from SGI.

 

If you are an employer or business, you can request an employee’s abstract using an SGI employer abstract authorization form. The employee would need to sign this form to consent to the release of their driving record.

It costs $15 to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract. This fee allows you to access a 3-year record of your driving history in the province.

 

Additional copies of your abstract requested at the same time are $5 per copy. For example, if you request your abstract plus two additional copies, it would be $15 + $5 + $5 = $25 total.

If you request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, you will be able to view and print your abstract instantly.

 

Requests made by fax, mail or in-person will usually be processed within 5 business days.

 

During peak seasons, such as the lead-up to road test season, processing times may take longer.

Yes, the fastest and most convenient way to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract is online through SGI’s MySGI portal. You will need to create an account first if you don’t already have one.

 

Once logged in, you can instantly view and print your abstract that covers your last 3 years of driving history in the province.

If there is incorrect information showing on your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract, you need to contact SGI to have this reviewed and rectified.

 

Errors may include incorrect dates, convictions, suspensions or collision details associated with your driving record. Contact SGI with details of the incorrect information, and provide any supporting evidence you have available.

No, your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract only shows demerit points and driving convictions that were incurred within Saskatchewan.

 

It will not show penalties applied to your driver’s licence while living in other provinces. However, serious out-of-province convictions can still result in additional sanctions once you become a Saskatchewan resident.

Demerit points remain on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence for 2 years from the conviction date. At the end of the 2-year period, the demerit points are removed from your licence.

 

If you incur additional demerit points within that 2 years, it will extend the time they remain on your record. The points from any new convictions will stay on your licence for 2 years from that latest date.

No, there is no way to erase or remove demerit points from your Saskatchewan driver’s licence before they expire. Demerit points remain on your licence for 2 years from the date of conviction.

 

The only way to reduce demerit points is to avoid incurring any new convictions until the existing points expire after the 2-year period ends.

If you accumulate 8 or more demerit points on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence within a 2-year period, SGI will review your driving record and you may be required to participate in the Driver Improvement Program.

 

If you reach 15 points within 3 years, your licence can be suspended. At 20 points, it may be cancelled and you would need to re-apply for your licence after the suspension ends.

You can check your current demerit point balance at any time by:

 

– Logging in to your MySGI account

– Visiting an SGI issuer and requesting a manual record check

– Obtaining a copy of your driver’s abstract, which lists demerit points

 

Your abstract provides a full 3-year record of driving convictions along with the associated demerit points and expiration date for when they will be removed from your licence.

The Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program is an intervention program run by SGI for drivers who accumulate a high number of traffic convictions or at-fault collisions.

 

If you reach 8 demerit points within 2 years, you may be sent a letter advising you that you have been identified as needing driver improvement. You will meet with an SGI official to discuss your driving record, complete a self-assessment, and possibly undergo driver training based on your situation.

Yes, failing to complete the conditions of the Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program can result in your licence being suspended or cancelled.

 

If you reach 15 demerit points within 3 years or 20 points within 2 years, your participation in the program becomes mandatory. If you then refuse to cooperate or don’t adequately complete the assigned conditions, SGI has authority to escalate the matter to further licence suspensions.

Driving Without Due Care and Attention is one of the most common traffic violations issued in Saskatchewan. SGI states drivers can be charged with this offence if you operate a vehicle in a way that constitutes a breach of your duty to the public.

 

This includes driving behaviours such as speeding, running stop signs or lights, aggressive driving, driving too closely, or driving while overtired or distracted. Fines start at $250.

Some of the most common traffic ticket fines in Saskatchewan include:

 

– Speeding – $175 to $550

– Driving Without Due Care and Attention – $250 to $500

– Disobey stop sign/traffic light – $175

– Using handheld device while driving – $280

– Fail to wear seatbelt – $175

– Fail to properly restrain children under 7 – $280

 

Fines are set out by SGI and local police agencies. Amounts may be higher in construction, playground and school zones.

The fine for using your phone or other handheld electronic communication device while driving in Saskatchewan is $280.

 

This applies to actions such as texting, emailing, dialing, viewing display screens unrelated to driving, and holding or manipulating the device in a cradle.

 

Fines are doubled in school and construction zones to $560. Hands-free use is still permitted.

Yes, under Section 199 of Saskatchewan’s Traffic Safety Act, police can lay a reckless driving charge for excessive speeding. This charge applies when officers observe or detect a vehicle to be driven “without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other persons or property”.

 

Fines for a first reckless driving conviction start at $1,000, plus possible licence suspension and 5 demerit points. Jail time is also possible for repeat offences.

If you are caught driving in Saskatchewan while your licence is suspended, you can face fines between $1,000 to $2,000 for a first occurrence.

 

For a second infraction, fines increase to a range of $2,000 to $5,000. You may also face up to 6 months in jail. Vehicles can also be impounded for up to 60 days if caught driving while suspended.

If convicted of impaired driving under the Criminal Code in Saskatchewan, you can face automatic provincial licence suspensions of 1 year for a first occurrence and 3 years for a second offence within 10 years.

 

For a third impaired driving offence within 10 years, you face a lifetime licence disqualification. However, you can apply for reinstatement after 10 years in this situation.

 

What is a Drivers Abstract in Saskatchewan?

A driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan is an official record provided by Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI). It summarizes your full history as a driver in the province.

The Saskatchewan drivers abstract contains key details about your driving record, including:

 

  • Driver’s license number
  • Date of birth
  • Class of license
  • Issue date
  • Expiry date
  • Endorsements
  • Restrictions
  • Demerit points
  • Convictions
  • Collisions
  • Driver improvement actions
  • Driver license status

 

Having this comprehensive snapshot of your driving history in one document can be useful for many reasons, which we’ll explore throughout this guide.

 

Why You Need a Drivers Abstract

There are several important reasons why you may need to obtain a copy of your Saskatchewan drivers abstract. Some of the most common reasons include:

 

Insurance Purposes

Insurance companies will often request your drivers abstract when issuing new policies or renewing existing ones. They use the information to accurately assess risk factors and determine your premiums based on your driving history and any past convictions.

 

Employment

Many employers, especially those who require employees to drive as part of their job, will ask for a current drivers abstract. This allows them to verify your license status and ensure you have a clean driving record before entrusting you with a company vehicle.

 

Border Crossings

A valid Saskatchewan drivers abstract may be required when crossing the US border. Border agents can request it to confirm you have a valid license and are authorized to drive in Canada.

 

Review Your Driving Record

Obtaining your own copy of your drivers abstract allows you to review your full driving history. You can check it for errors, see any traffic violations or collisions, ensure proper credit for clean years, and monitor for high-risk status.

 

What’s Included in a SK Drivers Abstract

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract includes important details about your driving history and license status. Here’s what you can expect to find on your abstract:

License Information

Your abstract will list personal details like your full name, date of birth, license number, issue date, and expiration date. It also shows the class of license you hold and any endorsements.

Violations

Any traffic violations like speeding tickets, failure to stop, seatbelt infractions, and other offenses will be listed. The abstract shows the date, location, and nature of each violation.

Collisions

The abstract records any collisions you’ve been involved in. At-fault collisions are clearly indicated. Details like date, location, and a brief incident description are included.

Suspensions

Suspensions and disqualifications due to too many demerits, medical reasons, DUIs, or other causes appear on your abstract. It notes the suspension start and end dates.

Medical Information

Certain medical conditions must be reported to the licensing authorities. Any medical restrictions related to your license are documented in this section.

 

How Far Back Does it Go?

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain information for the past 5 years, with some exceptions. For most traffic offences and collisions, the abstract will show a 3 year history. However, Criminal Code violations and suspensions related to alcohol or drug impaired driving will remain on your SK abstract for 5 years.

Here is what will show for 5 years on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract:

 

  • Impaired driving suspensions
  • Driving while disqualified suspensions
  • Criminal Code driving convictions like dangerous driving
  • Failing or refusing to provide a breath or blood sample
  • Driving while suspended under the Alcohol and Gaming Regulation Act

 

All other driving offences, at-fault claims, and collisions will remain on your SK abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. This includes things like speeding tickets, stop sign violations, improper turns, following too close, distracted driving, etc.

Knowing what stays on your driving record is important, especially if you’ll be using your Saskatchewan drivers abstract for employment purposes where a clean record is required. Certain Criminal Code violations can continue to impact your abstract eligibility long after the incident occurred.

 

How to Get Your Saskatchewan Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to obtain your drivers abstract in Saskatchewan:

 

Online

The quickest and easiest way is to request your abstract online through SGI. You can login to your MySGI account and view your abstract immediately. To order a print copy, there is a small fee. Make sure you have a MySGI account set up ahead of time.

 

In-Person

Visit any SGI issuer office in-person and request a copy of your abstract. You will need to provide sufficient ID and pay the $15 fee. This method allows you to walk out with your abstract printed on the spot.

 

By Mail/Fax

You can request an abstract by mailing or faxing a completed Driver Abstract Request Form to SGI. Be sure to include payment information. Processing can take up to 5 business days. You will receive the abstract by mail. The mailing address and fax number are on the form.

No matter which method you choose, you will need your 9-digit Saskatchewan drivers license number ready to verify your identity.

 

Drivers Abstract Cost

One of the most common questions about obtaining your Saskatchewan drivers abstract relates to cost. How much does it cost to get your driving record from SGI?

The current fee for a personal Saskatchewan drivers abstract is $15. This pricing applies whether you request your abstract online, in-person at an SGI location, or by mail. The $15 covers the lookup and documentation fees associated with generating your official driving record.

Commercial drivers abstracts also cost $15 through SGI. So if you need your full commercial and personal driving history, it will be $15 for each report.

There are no discounts or exemptions from the $15 fee per abstract. All Saskatchewan drivers must pay this amount to access their records. The only exception is if you require your abstract for certain legal reasons – in those cases SGI may waive the fee.

So in summary, expect to pay $15 for each personal or commercial Saskatchewan drivers abstract you request from SGI. This standard $15 pricing makes it affordable for all drivers to access their records.

 

How Long is it Valid?

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is only valid for 30 days from the issue date. After 30 days, the abstract is considered expired and can no longer be used as an official record of your driving history. This is an important detail to note if you’re using your abstract for employment, insurance, car loan or legal purposes.

The 30-day validity period exists to ensure the abstract contains the most up-to-date information. Within that 30 days, any new charges, convictions or other changes will be added to your driving record and reflected on subsequent abstracts. Relying on an expired abstract could provide inaccurate or incomplete details about your history behind the wheel.

So if you order a copy of your SK drivers abstract, be sure to use it right away for its intended purpose. And don’t try to pass off an outdated abstract after 30 days have passed. Only a current abstract within the validity period will be accepted as valid proof of your driving record.

 

Understanding Your Drivers Abstract

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain several sections with important details about your driving history. Reviewing a sample abstract can help you understand exactly what’s included.

The top of the document will have your full legal name, date of birth, driver’s license number, and the issue date for the abstract. This section verifies your identity.

The Convictions section lists any traffic violations you’ve been convicted of within the time period covered by the abstract. This includes offenses like speeding, failure to stop, and distracted driving. Each conviction shows the date, a short description, and the number of demerit points associated with it.

The Administrative Sanctions section covers penalties imposed by SGI against your license, such as suspensions. It provides the start and end dates for each sanction along with a brief explanation like “3 Day ALS Fail.”

Any collisions where you were deemed fully or partially responsible are listed in the At-Fault Claims section. This provides the date and a summary of each incident. Fatalities or injuries from at-fault collisions may also be noted.

The Abstract Totals segment at the end tallies up key figures like the total number of convictions, the lifetime demerit points, and whether your license status is clear or suspended.

Knowing how to interpret each component can help you verify your abstract is accurate and understand how your driving record is being evaluated.

 

Disputing Information on Your Abstract

If you find any errors or inaccuracies on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract, you can dispute this information by contacting SGI directly.

The first step is to carefully review your abstract to identify any incorrect violations, convictions, suspensions or other driving history details that have been recorded. Make note of any errors you find.

Next, contact SGI’s Driver Records department by phone or mail. Be prepared to provide your name, license number, date of birth and details on the errors you wish to dispute. SGI may request supporting documentation such as court records to correct serious offenses.

For minor inaccuracies, SGI will investigate based on the details you provide. If the error is validated, SGI will update your driving record. This corrected abstract can then be used for insurance, employment or any other purposes requiring your driving history.

It’s important to dispute mistakes on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract in a timely manner. Driving records are used to make decisions about insurance rates, licensing and employability for commercial drivers. Inaccurate violations or offenses could lead to unjust penalties or premium increases.

By contacting SGI to correct errors on your abstract, you can ensure it accurately reflects your true driving history in Saskatchewan.

 

Improving Your Driving Record

If you’ve ended up with a less-than-stellar driving record, there are steps you can take to improve it. Having violations and collisions on your record can impact your insurance rates and even your ability to drive commercially or keep your license. Focus on driving defensively and minimizing further incidents.

Consider taking a defensive driving course. These courses teach anticipatory driving and how to avoid collisions. Many insurance companies will offer a discount on your premiums for completing an approved defensive driving course. This can help offset the increase caused by violations on your record.

Be mindful of road conditions, distractions, impairment, aggression, and drowsy driving. Drive for the conditions, put your phone away, and make sure you’re alert and focused. Follow the rules of the road and speed limits. Don’t drive if impaired by alcohol, drugs, or lack of sleep.

Check the point system in Saskatchewan to understand how different violations impact your license. Work on eliminating behaviours that lead to violations and collisions. Minor offenses like speeding or running a red light add up over time. Major offenses can cause immediate suspension. Drive carefully to keep your record clean.

Wait for violations to roll off your abstract after 3 years. Over time, as you avoid further incidents, your record will start to improve. Old tickets and collisions drop off your abstract after 36 months. Maintain a clean record long enough and your insurance rates will decrease.

 

High-Risk Driver Designation

In Saskatchewan, drivers who accumulate an excessive number of traffic violations, at-fault collisions, or specific convictions may be designated as “high-risk drivers” by SGI. This designation is part of SGI’s Driver Improvement Program aimed at improving road safety.

The criteria for being designated a high-risk driver include:

 

  • Accumulating 15 or more demerit points within 2 years
  • Being convicted of excessive speeding (50 km/h or more over the speed limit)
  • Being convicted of criminal negligence causing death or bodily harm
  • Having a poor collision record, including multiple at-fault collisions within a short time period

 

Once designated as a high-risk driver, there are several consequences including:

 

  • Having to pay a High Risk Driver premium on your auto insurance
  • Having your drivers license suspended for up to 6 months
  • Being required to take the SGI Driver Improvement Program course

 

The Driver Improvement Program involves taking a full-day in-class education session combined with an in-car coaching session. It is designed to identify and address poor driving habits and attitudes. Completing the program is mandatory for high-risk designated drivers who want to regain their full driving privileges.

 

Commercial Drivers Abstracts

Commercial drivers in Saskatchewan require a special commercial drivers abstract in addition to their regular drivers abstract. This is required for anyone applying for or renewing Class 1-4 driver’s licenses.

Commercial drivers abstracts contain additional information required for assessing commercial driving privileges, including:

 

  • Current Driver Status
  • Commercial Driver’s License Information
  • NSC Safety Rating
  • ME/CV Medical Expiry Date
  • Current Demerit Points
  • Convictions & Collisions
  • Commercial Vehicle Inspections
  • Sanctions

 

Commercial drivers abstracts can be obtained by request from the SGI, usually within 1-3 business days. There is a $15 fee.

It’s important for commercial drivers to stay on top of their driving records, as any convictions, at-fault collisions, or violations can negatively impact their ability to maintain necessary commercial driving privileges. Regularly reviewing your commercial abstract helps identify any issues early.

 

Using Your Saskatchewan Abstract

Your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract serves many important purposes beyond just reviewing your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways your SK abstract may be used:

 

Insurance

Auto insurance providers will often request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract when determining your premiums. A clean driving record with no accidents, tickets or suspensions will generally qualify you for the lowest insurance rates. Minor incidents may lead to slightly higher premiums, while multiple, more serious violations can cause steep rate increases.

It’s in your best interest to periodically review your own abstract and dispute any incorrect information, so you aren’t paying higher premiums due to errors on your record. Maintaining a clean abstract by driving safely and responsibly will save you money on insurance costs over the long run.

 

Employment

Certain employers, especially those requiring driving for work, will ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract during the hiring process and throughout your employment. Positions like truck drivers, couriers, delivery drivers, chauffeurs and commercial vehicle operators usually require a clean abstract.

For liability reasons, employers need to confirm you have a valid license and safe driving history before allowing you to drive for work purposes. A poor abstract with multiple violations may disqualify you from being hired or lead to dismissal if you are already employed.

 

Crossing the Border

When crossing into the United States at land ports of entry, border officials may ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract along with your passport and other ID. This helps verify you have a valid license and clean driving record.

Entering the U.S. with a suspended license or multiple violations on your abstract can lead to denied entry or other problems at the border. Keeping your abstract up to date and in good standing makes border crossings quick and easy.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is an important record of your driving history in the province. It provides a comprehensive overview of any collisions, violations, suspensions or serious offenses associated with your driver’s license.

While the information on your abstract is essential for insurance providers and employers to evaluate your driving risk, don’t let a few minor blemishes give you cause for concern. Most drivers will have an incident or two appear on their record over the years.

The key is to routinely review your abstract and understand how past driving behavior may impact your insurance rates, ability to rent vehicles, or opportunities for employment requiring driving. If any information appears incorrect, pursue options to dispute or correct it right away.

Above all, drive safely and responsibly going forward. This will limit new entries on your abstract while also demonstrating to insurers that you’ve improved as a driver. While your history remains relevant, companies will pay the most attention to your current driving record.

Maintaining a clean, violation-free abstract for a number of years is the best approach for minimizing insurance premiums and securing jobs dependent on your driving record. Mature and reformed driving habits will advocate for you better than any other credential on your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan.

Saskatchewan Driver's Abstract​ Questions

To get your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan, you need to submit a request to SGI (Saskatchewan Government Insurance). You can request your abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, by fax, mail, or in person at an SGI issuer. The fee is $15 per abstract. Your abstract will provide a 3-year record of any convictions, collisions, suspensions, revocations, and driving prohibitions.

A Saskatchewan driver’s abstract includes your:

 

– Name

– Date of birth

– Driver’s licence number

– Driver’s licence class

– Issue and expiry dates

– Medical conditions that require you to have an adjusted licence

– Convictions and suspensions for the past 3 years

– Collisions you’ve been involved in for the past 3 years

– Demerit points total

Saskatchewan driver abstracts provide a 3-year record of your driving history. This includes any collisions, convictions, suspensions, revocations or driving prohibitions in the last 3 years.

 

If you have been licensed in Saskatchewan for less than 3 years, your abstract will only go back to when you first became a Saskatchewan resident or received your Saskatchewan driver’s licence.

No, you cannot access someone else’s driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan unless you have written consent from that person. Third-party consent forms are available from SGI.

 

If you are an employer or business, you can request an employee’s abstract using an SGI employer abstract authorization form. The employee would need to sign this form to consent to the release of their driving record.

It costs $15 to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract. This fee allows you to access a 3-year record of your driving history in the province.

 

Additional copies of your abstract requested at the same time are $5 per copy. For example, if you request your abstract plus two additional copies, it would be $15 + $5 + $5 = $25 total.

If you request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, you will be able to view and print your abstract instantly.

 

Requests made by fax, mail or in-person will usually be processed within 5 business days.

 

During peak seasons, such as the lead-up to road test season, processing times may take longer.

Yes, the fastest and most convenient way to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract is online through SGI’s MySGI portal. You will need to create an account first if you don’t already have one.

 

Once logged in, you can instantly view and print your abstract that covers your last 3 years of driving history in the province.

If there is incorrect information showing on your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract, you need to contact SGI to have this reviewed and rectified.

 

Errors may include incorrect dates, convictions, suspensions or collision details associated with your driving record. Contact SGI with details of the incorrect information, and provide any supporting evidence you have available.

No, your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract only shows demerit points and driving convictions that were incurred within Saskatchewan.

 

It will not show penalties applied to your driver’s licence while living in other provinces. However, serious out-of-province convictions can still result in additional sanctions once you become a Saskatchewan resident.

Demerit points remain on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence for 2 years from the conviction date. At the end of the 2-year period, the demerit points are removed from your licence.

 

If you incur additional demerit points within that 2 years, it will extend the time they remain on your record. The points from any new convictions will stay on your licence for 2 years from that latest date.

No, there is no way to erase or remove demerit points from your Saskatchewan driver’s licence before they expire. Demerit points remain on your licence for 2 years from the date of conviction.

 

The only way to reduce demerit points is to avoid incurring any new convictions until the existing points expire after the 2-year period ends.

If you accumulate 8 or more demerit points on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence within a 2-year period, SGI will review your driving record and you may be required to participate in the Driver Improvement Program.

 

If you reach 15 points within 3 years, your licence can be suspended. At 20 points, it may be cancelled and you would need to re-apply for your licence after the suspension ends.

You can check your current demerit point balance at any time by:

 

– Logging in to your MySGI account

– Visiting an SGI issuer and requesting a manual record check

– Obtaining a copy of your driver’s abstract, which lists demerit points

 

Your abstract provides a full 3-year record of driving convictions along with the associated demerit points and expiration date for when they will be removed from your licence.

The Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program is an intervention program run by SGI for drivers who accumulate a high number of traffic convictions or at-fault collisions.

 

If you reach 8 demerit points within 2 years, you may be sent a letter advising you that you have been identified as needing driver improvement. You will meet with an SGI official to discuss your driving record, complete a self-assessment, and possibly undergo driver training based on your situation.

Yes, failing to complete the conditions of the Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program can result in your licence being suspended or cancelled.

 

If you reach 15 demerit points within 3 years or 20 points within 2 years, your participation in the program becomes mandatory. If you then refuse to cooperate or don’t adequately complete the assigned conditions, SGI has authority to escalate the matter to further licence suspensions.

Driving Without Due Care and Attention is one of the most common traffic violations issued in Saskatchewan. SGI states drivers can be charged with this offence if you operate a vehicle in a way that constitutes a breach of your duty to the public.

 

This includes driving behaviours such as speeding, running stop signs or lights, aggressive driving, driving too closely, or driving while overtired or distracted. Fines start at $250.

Some of the most common traffic ticket fines in Saskatchewan include:

 

– Speeding – $175 to $550

– Driving Without Due Care and Attention – $250 to $500

– Disobey stop sign/traffic light – $175

– Using handheld device while driving – $280

– Fail to wear seatbelt – $175

– Fail to properly restrain children under 7 – $280

 

Fines are set out by SGI and local police agencies. Amounts may be higher in construction, playground and school zones.

The fine for using your phone or other handheld electronic communication device while driving in Saskatchewan is $280.

 

This applies to actions such as texting, emailing, dialing, viewing display screens unrelated to driving, and holding or manipulating the device in a cradle.

 

Fines are doubled in school and construction zones to $560. Hands-free use is still permitted.

Yes, under Section 199 of Saskatchewan’s Traffic Safety Act, police can lay a reckless driving charge for excessive speeding. This charge applies when officers observe or detect a vehicle to be driven “without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other persons or property”.

 

Fines for a first reckless driving conviction start at $1,000, plus possible licence suspension and 5 demerit points. Jail time is also possible for repeat offences.

If you are caught driving in Saskatchewan while your licence is suspended, you can face fines between $1,000 to $2,000 for a first occurrence.

 

For a second infraction, fines increase to a range of $2,000 to $5,000. You may also face up to 6 months in jail. Vehicles can also be impounded for up to 60 days if caught driving while suspended.

If convicted of impaired driving under the Criminal Code in Saskatchewan, you can face automatic provincial licence suspensions of 1 year for a first occurrence and 3 years for a second offence within 10 years.

 

For a third impaired driving offence within 10 years, you face a lifetime licence disqualification. However, you can apply for reinstatement after 10 years in this situation.

 

What is a Drivers Abstract in Saskatchewan?

A driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan is an official record provided by Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI). It summarizes your full history as a driver in the province.

The Saskatchewan drivers abstract contains key details about your driving record, including:

 

  • Driver’s license number
  • Date of birth
  • Class of license
  • Issue date
  • Expiry date
  • Endorsements
  • Restrictions
  • Demerit points
  • Convictions
  • Collisions
  • Driver improvement actions
  • Driver license status

 

Having this comprehensive snapshot of your driving history in one document can be useful for many reasons, which we’ll explore throughout this guide.

 

Why You Need a Drivers Abstract

There are several important reasons why you may need to obtain a copy of your Saskatchewan drivers abstract. Some of the most common reasons include:

 

Insurance Purposes

Insurance companies will often request your drivers abstract when issuing new policies or renewing existing ones. They use the information to accurately assess risk factors and determine your premiums based on your driving history and any past convictions.

 

Employment

Many employers, especially those who require employees to drive as part of their job, will ask for a current drivers abstract. This allows them to verify your license status and ensure you have a clean driving record before entrusting you with a company vehicle.

 

Border Crossings

A valid Saskatchewan drivers abstract may be required when crossing the US border. Border agents can request it to confirm you have a valid license and are authorized to drive in Canada.

 

Review Your Driving Record

Obtaining your own copy of your drivers abstract allows you to review your full driving history. You can check it for errors, see any traffic violations or collisions, ensure proper credit for clean years, and monitor for high-risk status.

 

What’s Included in a SK Drivers Abstract

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract includes important details about your driving history and license status. Here’s what you can expect to find on your abstract:

License Information

Your abstract will list personal details like your full name, date of birth, license number, issue date, and expiration date. It also shows the class of license you hold and any endorsements.

Violations

Any traffic violations like speeding tickets, failure to stop, seatbelt infractions, and other offenses will be listed. The abstract shows the date, location, and nature of each violation.

Collisions

The abstract records any collisions you’ve been involved in. At-fault collisions are clearly indicated. Details like date, location, and a brief incident description are included.

Suspensions

Suspensions and disqualifications due to too many demerits, medical reasons, DUIs, or other causes appear on your abstract. It notes the suspension start and end dates.

Medical Information

Certain medical conditions must be reported to the licensing authorities. Any medical restrictions related to your license are documented in this section.

 

How Far Back Does it Go?

A Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain information for the past 5 years, with some exceptions. For most traffic offences and collisions, the abstract will show a 3 year history. However, Criminal Code violations and suspensions related to alcohol or drug impaired driving will remain on your SK abstract for 5 years.

Here is what will show for 5 years on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract:

 

  • Impaired driving suspensions
  • Driving while disqualified suspensions
  • Criminal Code driving convictions like dangerous driving
  • Failing or refusing to provide a breath or blood sample
  • Driving while suspended under the Alcohol and Gaming Regulation Act

 

All other driving offences, at-fault claims, and collisions will remain on your SK abstract for 3 years from the conviction date. This includes things like speeding tickets, stop sign violations, improper turns, following too close, distracted driving, etc.

Knowing what stays on your driving record is important, especially if you’ll be using your Saskatchewan drivers abstract for employment purposes where a clean record is required. Certain Criminal Code violations can continue to impact your abstract eligibility long after the incident occurred.

 

How to Get Your Saskatchewan Drivers Abstract

There are a few different ways to obtain your drivers abstract in Saskatchewan:

 

Online

The quickest and easiest way is to request your abstract online through SGI. You can login to your MySGI account and view your abstract immediately. To order a print copy, there is a small fee. Make sure you have a MySGI account set up ahead of time.

 

In-Person

Visit any SGI issuer office in-person and request a copy of your abstract. You will need to provide sufficient ID and pay the $15 fee. This method allows you to walk out with your abstract printed on the spot.

 

By Mail/Fax

You can request an abstract by mailing or faxing a completed Driver Abstract Request Form to SGI. Be sure to include payment information. Processing can take up to 5 business days. You will receive the abstract by mail. The mailing address and fax number are on the form.

No matter which method you choose, you will need your 9-digit Saskatchewan drivers license number ready to verify your identity.

 

Drivers Abstract Cost

One of the most common questions about obtaining your Saskatchewan drivers abstract relates to cost. How much does it cost to get your driving record from SGI?

The current fee for a personal Saskatchewan drivers abstract is $15. This pricing applies whether you request your abstract online, in-person at an SGI location, or by mail. The $15 covers the lookup and documentation fees associated with generating your official driving record.

Commercial drivers abstracts also cost $15 through SGI. So if you need your full commercial and personal driving history, it will be $15 for each report.

There are no discounts or exemptions from the $15 fee per abstract. All Saskatchewan drivers must pay this amount to access their records. The only exception is if you require your abstract for certain legal reasons – in those cases SGI may waive the fee.

So in summary, expect to pay $15 for each personal or commercial Saskatchewan drivers abstract you request from SGI. This standard $15 pricing makes it affordable for all drivers to access their records.

 

How Long is it Valid?

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is only valid for 30 days from the issue date. After 30 days, the abstract is considered expired and can no longer be used as an official record of your driving history. This is an important detail to note if you’re using your abstract for employment, insurance, car loan or legal purposes.

The 30-day validity period exists to ensure the abstract contains the most up-to-date information. Within that 30 days, any new charges, convictions or other changes will be added to your driving record and reflected on subsequent abstracts. Relying on an expired abstract could provide inaccurate or incomplete details about your history behind the wheel.

So if you order a copy of your SK drivers abstract, be sure to use it right away for its intended purpose. And don’t try to pass off an outdated abstract after 30 days have passed. Only a current abstract within the validity period will be accepted as valid proof of your driving record.

 

Understanding Your Drivers Abstract

Your Saskatchewan drivers abstract will contain several sections with important details about your driving history. Reviewing a sample abstract can help you understand exactly what’s included.

The top of the document will have your full legal name, date of birth, driver’s license number, and the issue date for the abstract. This section verifies your identity.

The Convictions section lists any traffic violations you’ve been convicted of within the time period covered by the abstract. This includes offenses like speeding, failure to stop, and distracted driving. Each conviction shows the date, a short description, and the number of demerit points associated with it.

The Administrative Sanctions section covers penalties imposed by SGI against your license, such as suspensions. It provides the start and end dates for each sanction along with a brief explanation like “3 Day ALS Fail.”

Any collisions where you were deemed fully or partially responsible are listed in the At-Fault Claims section. This provides the date and a summary of each incident. Fatalities or injuries from at-fault collisions may also be noted.

The Abstract Totals segment at the end tallies up key figures like the total number of convictions, the lifetime demerit points, and whether your license status is clear or suspended.

Knowing how to interpret each component can help you verify your abstract is accurate and understand how your driving record is being evaluated.

 

Disputing Information on Your Abstract

If you find any errors or inaccuracies on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract, you can dispute this information by contacting SGI directly.

The first step is to carefully review your abstract to identify any incorrect violations, convictions, suspensions or other driving history details that have been recorded. Make note of any errors you find.

Next, contact SGI’s Driver Records department by phone or mail. Be prepared to provide your name, license number, date of birth and details on the errors you wish to dispute. SGI may request supporting documentation such as court records to correct serious offenses.

For minor inaccuracies, SGI will investigate based on the details you provide. If the error is validated, SGI will update your driving record. This corrected abstract can then be used for insurance, employment or any other purposes requiring your driving history.

It’s important to dispute mistakes on your Saskatchewan drivers abstract in a timely manner. Driving records are used to make decisions about insurance rates, licensing and employability for commercial drivers. Inaccurate violations or offenses could lead to unjust penalties or premium increases.

By contacting SGI to correct errors on your abstract, you can ensure it accurately reflects your true driving history in Saskatchewan.

 

Improving Your Driving Record

If you’ve ended up with a less-than-stellar driving record, there are steps you can take to improve it. Having violations and collisions on your record can impact your insurance rates and even your ability to drive commercially or keep your license. Focus on driving defensively and minimizing further incidents.

Consider taking a defensive driving course. These courses teach anticipatory driving and how to avoid collisions. Many insurance companies will offer a discount on your premiums for completing an approved defensive driving course. This can help offset the increase caused by violations on your record.

Be mindful of road conditions, distractions, impairment, aggression, and drowsy driving. Drive for the conditions, put your phone away, and make sure you’re alert and focused. Follow the rules of the road and speed limits. Don’t drive if impaired by alcohol, drugs, or lack of sleep.

Check the point system in Saskatchewan to understand how different violations impact your license. Work on eliminating behaviours that lead to violations and collisions. Minor offenses like speeding or running a red light add up over time. Major offenses can cause immediate suspension. Drive carefully to keep your record clean.

Wait for violations to roll off your abstract after 3 years. Over time, as you avoid further incidents, your record will start to improve. Old tickets and collisions drop off your abstract after 36 months. Maintain a clean record long enough and your insurance rates will decrease.

 

High-Risk Driver Designation

In Saskatchewan, drivers who accumulate an excessive number of traffic violations, at-fault collisions, or specific convictions may be designated as “high-risk drivers” by SGI. This designation is part of SGI’s Driver Improvement Program aimed at improving road safety.

The criteria for being designated a high-risk driver include:

 

  • Accumulating 15 or more demerit points within 2 years
  • Being convicted of excessive speeding (50 km/h or more over the speed limit)
  • Being convicted of criminal negligence causing death or bodily harm
  • Having a poor collision record, including multiple at-fault collisions within a short time period

 

Once designated as a high-risk driver, there are several consequences including:

 

  • Having to pay a High Risk Driver premium on your auto insurance
  • Having your drivers license suspended for up to 6 months
  • Being required to take the SGI Driver Improvement Program course

 

The Driver Improvement Program involves taking a full-day in-class education session combined with an in-car coaching session. It is designed to identify and address poor driving habits and attitudes. Completing the program is mandatory for high-risk designated drivers who want to regain their full driving privileges.

 

Commercial Drivers Abstracts

Commercial drivers in Saskatchewan require a special commercial drivers abstract in addition to their regular drivers abstract. This is required for anyone applying for or renewing Class 1-4 driver’s licenses.

Commercial drivers abstracts contain additional information required for assessing commercial driving privileges, including:

 

  • Current Driver Status
  • Commercial Driver’s License Information
  • NSC Safety Rating
  • ME/CV Medical Expiry Date
  • Current Demerit Points
  • Convictions & Collisions
  • Commercial Vehicle Inspections
  • Sanctions

 

Commercial drivers abstracts can be obtained by request from the SGI, usually within 1-3 business days. There is a $15 fee.

It’s important for commercial drivers to stay on top of their driving records, as any convictions, at-fault collisions, or violations can negatively impact their ability to maintain necessary commercial driving privileges. Regularly reviewing your commercial abstract helps identify any issues early.

 

Using Your Saskatchewan Abstract

Your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract serves many important purposes beyond just reviewing your own driving record. Here are some of the main ways your SK abstract may be used:

 

Insurance

Auto insurance providers will often request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract when determining your premiums. A clean driving record with no accidents, tickets or suspensions will generally qualify you for the lowest insurance rates. Minor incidents may lead to slightly higher premiums, while multiple, more serious violations can cause steep rate increases.

It’s in your best interest to periodically review your own abstract and dispute any incorrect information, so you aren’t paying higher premiums due to errors on your record. Maintaining a clean abstract by driving safely and responsibly will save you money on insurance costs over the long run.

 

Employment

Certain employers, especially those requiring driving for work, will ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract during the hiring process and throughout your employment. Positions like truck drivers, couriers, delivery drivers, chauffeurs and commercial vehicle operators usually require a clean abstract.

For liability reasons, employers need to confirm you have a valid license and safe driving history before allowing you to drive for work purposes. A poor abstract with multiple violations may disqualify you from being hired or lead to dismissal if you are already employed.

 

Crossing the Border

When crossing into the United States at land ports of entry, border officials may ask for your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract along with your passport and other ID. This helps verify you have a valid license and clean driving record.

Entering the U.S. with a suspended license or multiple violations on your abstract can lead to denied entry or other problems at the border. Keeping your abstract up to date and in good standing makes border crossings quick and easy.

 

Conclusion

In summary, your Saskatchewan drivers abstract is an important record of your driving history in the province. It provides a comprehensive overview of any collisions, violations, suspensions or serious offenses associated with your driver’s license.

While the information on your abstract is essential for insurance providers and employers to evaluate your driving risk, don’t let a few minor blemishes give you cause for concern. Most drivers will have an incident or two appear on their record over the years.

The key is to routinely review your abstract and understand how past driving behavior may impact your insurance rates, ability to rent vehicles, or opportunities for employment requiring driving. If any information appears incorrect, pursue options to dispute or correct it right away.

Above all, drive safely and responsibly going forward. This will limit new entries on your abstract while also demonstrating to insurers that you’ve improved as a driver. While your history remains relevant, companies will pay the most attention to your current driving record.

Maintaining a clean, violation-free abstract for a number of years is the best approach for minimizing insurance premiums and securing jobs dependent on your driving record. Mature and reformed driving habits will advocate for you better than any other credential on your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan.

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Saskatchewan Driver's Abstract​ Questions

To get your driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan, you need to submit a request to SGI (Saskatchewan Government Insurance). You can request your abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, by fax, mail, or in person at an SGI issuer. The fee is $15 per abstract. Your abstract will provide a 3-year record of any convictions, collisions, suspensions, revocations, and driving prohibitions.

A Saskatchewan driver’s abstract includes your:

 

– Name

– Date of birth

– Driver’s licence number

– Driver’s licence class

– Issue and expiry dates

– Medical conditions that require you to have an adjusted licence

– Convictions and suspensions for the past 3 years

– Collisions you’ve been involved in for the past 3 years

– Demerit points total

Saskatchewan driver abstracts provide a 3-year record of your driving history. This includes any collisions, convictions, suspensions, revocations or driving prohibitions in the last 3 years.

 

If you have been licensed in Saskatchewan for less than 3 years, your abstract will only go back to when you first became a Saskatchewan resident or received your Saskatchewan driver’s licence.

No, you cannot access someone else’s driver’s abstract in Saskatchewan unless you have written consent from that person. Third-party consent forms are available from SGI.

 

If you are an employer or business, you can request an employee’s abstract using an SGI employer abstract authorization form. The employee would need to sign this form to consent to the release of their driving record.

It costs $15 to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract. This fee allows you to access a 3-year record of your driving history in the province.

 

Additional copies of your abstract requested at the same time are $5 per copy. For example, if you request your abstract plus two additional copies, it would be $15 + $5 + $5 = $25 total.

If you request your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract online through SGI’s MySGI portal, you will be able to view and print your abstract instantly.

 

Requests made by fax, mail or in-person will usually be processed within 5 business days.

 

During peak seasons, such as the lead-up to road test season, processing times may take longer.

Yes, the fastest and most convenient way to obtain your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract is online through SGI’s MySGI portal. You will need to create an account first if you don’t already have one.

 

Once logged in, you can instantly view and print your abstract that covers your last 3 years of driving history in the province.

If there is incorrect information showing on your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract, you need to contact SGI to have this reviewed and rectified.

 

Errors may include incorrect dates, convictions, suspensions or collision details associated with your driving record. Contact SGI with details of the incorrect information, and provide any supporting evidence you have available.

No, your Saskatchewan driver’s abstract only shows demerit points and driving convictions that were incurred within Saskatchewan.

 

It will not show penalties applied to your driver’s licence while living in other provinces. However, serious out-of-province convictions can still result in additional sanctions once you become a Saskatchewan resident.

Demerit points remain on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence for 2 years from the conviction date. At the end of the 2-year period, the demerit points are removed from your licence.

 

If you incur additional demerit points within that 2 years, it will extend the time they remain on your record. The points from any new convictions will stay on your licence for 2 years from that latest date.

No, there is no way to erase or remove demerit points from your Saskatchewan driver’s licence before they expire. Demerit points remain on your licence for 2 years from the date of conviction.

 

The only way to reduce demerit points is to avoid incurring any new convictions until the existing points expire after the 2-year period ends.

If you accumulate 8 or more demerit points on your Saskatchewan driver’s licence within a 2-year period, SGI will review your driving record and you may be required to participate in the Driver Improvement Program.

 

If you reach 15 points within 3 years, your licence can be suspended. At 20 points, it may be cancelled and you would need to re-apply for your licence after the suspension ends.

You can check your current demerit point balance at any time by:

 

– Logging in to your MySGI account

– Visiting an SGI issuer and requesting a manual record check

– Obtaining a copy of your driver’s abstract, which lists demerit points

 

Your abstract provides a full 3-year record of driving convictions along with the associated demerit points and expiration date for when they will be removed from your licence.

The Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program is an intervention program run by SGI for drivers who accumulate a high number of traffic convictions or at-fault collisions.

 

If you reach 8 demerit points within 2 years, you may be sent a letter advising you that you have been identified as needing driver improvement. You will meet with an SGI official to discuss your driving record, complete a self-assessment, and possibly undergo driver training based on your situation.

Yes, failing to complete the conditions of the Saskatchewan Driver Improvement Program can result in your licence being suspended or cancelled.

 

If you reach 15 demerit points within 3 years or 20 points within 2 years, your participation in the program becomes mandatory. If you then refuse to cooperate or don’t adequately complete the assigned conditions, SGI has authority to escalate the matter to further licence suspensions.

Driving Without Due Care and Attention is one of the most common traffic violations issued in Saskatchewan. SGI states drivers can be charged with this offence if you operate a vehicle in a way that constitutes a breach of your duty to the public.

 

This includes driving behaviours such as speeding, running stop signs or lights, aggressive driving, driving too closely, or driving while overtired or distracted. Fines start at $250.

Some of the most common traffic ticket fines in Saskatchewan include:

 

– Speeding – $175 to $550

– Driving Without Due Care and Attention – $250 to $500

– Disobey stop sign/traffic light – $175

– Using handheld device while driving – $280

– Fail to wear seatbelt – $175

– Fail to properly restrain children under 7 – $280

 

Fines are set out by SGI and local police agencies. Amounts may be higher in construction, playground and school zones.

The fine for using your phone or other handheld electronic communication device while driving in Saskatchewan is $280.

 

This applies to actions such as texting, emailing, dialing, viewing display screens unrelated to driving, and holding or manipulating the device in a cradle.

 

Fines are doubled in school and construction zones to $560. Hands-free use is still permitted.

Yes, under Section 199 of Saskatchewan’s Traffic Safety Act, police can lay a reckless driving charge for excessive speeding. This charge applies when officers observe or detect a vehicle to be driven “without due care and attention and without reasonable consideration for other persons or property”.

 

Fines for a first reckless driving conviction start at $1,000, plus possible licence suspension and 5 demerit points. Jail time is also possible for repeat offences.

If you are caught driving in Saskatchewan while your licence is suspended, you can face fines between $1,000 to $2,000 for a first occurrence.

 

For a second infraction, fines increase to a range of $2,000 to $5,000. You may also face up to 6 months in jail. Vehicles can also be impounded for up to 60 days if caught driving while suspended.

If convicted of impaired driving under the Criminal Code in Saskatchewan, you can face automatic provincial licence suspensions of 1 year for a first occurrence and 3 years for a second offence within 10 years.

 

For a third impaired driving offence within 10 years, you face a lifetime licence disqualification. However, you can apply for reinstatement after 10 years in this situation.

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